Canon EOS R for Astrophotography

StoneColdCoffee

EOS M50
Feb 11, 2014
49
0
I need some help. I have searched all over the internet to find out some information about how the EOS R handles Astrophotography, but I cant really find any technical information or reviews. I shoot with the 6D and it is still awesome with the night sky. But I wonder if the R handles the stars and milky way even better. I would appreciate it if anyone has seen some reviews or has some experience with it out in the wild. thanks.
 

LSXPhotog

EOS RP
Apr 2, 2015
351
176
www.diossiphotography.com
I need some help. I have searched all over the internet to find out some information about how the EOS R handles Astrophotography, but I cant really find any technical information or reviews. I shoot with the 6D and it is still awesome with the night sky. But I wonder if the R handles the stars and milky way even better. I would appreciate it if anyone has seen some reviews or has some experience with it out in the wild. thanks.
It should handle it just as well as a 5D4, which is very good...but not stellar. The best Astro camera on the market is considered the D850 - which I disagreed with, but I've never personally shot with one. I've just seen the pixel level noise of the camera and feel like the reviewers mistook noise for stars. Haha jk

Just research the 5D4 in regards to Astro.
 

Larsskv

EOS 7D MK II
Jun 12, 2015
759
178
I saw some banding when I was pushing an accidentally underexposed picture from my R yesterday. My 5DIV would never show banding in a similar situation.

Therefore, for astro, I would have more confidence in the 5DIV, and also the 6D.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
491
162
People do seem to say there's just a little bit more banding when pushing a dark photo from the EOS R than the 5D4. I haven't really noticed it though. I think it's only on severely under-exposed photos, like more underexposed than you even want with astrophotography. Also note that the fact that the EOS R's sensor is always active any time the camera is on might lead to a little more heat in the sensor, and therefore a little more noise.

On the other hand, if I'm not mistaken, you can use the silent shutter even in bulb mode on the EOS R, which means absolutely no shake induced by moving parts in the camera while trying to take a long exposure, which is nice.

Honestly it's probably splitting hairs between the 5D4 and the EOS R when it comes to which is better for astrophotography. From a practical standpoint though, the 5D4 is probably a little more rugged and better weather sealed, which is important for a lot of the conditions you'll probably be dealing with when doing astrophotography.
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
8,021
1,477
Canada
People do seem to say there's just a little bit more banding when pushing a dark photo from the EOS R than the 5D4. I haven't really noticed it though. I think it's only on severely under-exposed photos, like more underexposed than you even want with astrophotography. Also note that the fact that the EOS R's sensor is always active any time the camera is on might lead to a little more heat in the sensor, and therefore a little more noise.

On the other hand, if I'm not mistaken, you can use the silent shutter even in bulb mode on the EOS R, which means absolutely no shake induced by moving parts in the camera while trying to take a long exposure, which is nice.

Honestly it's probably splitting hairs between the 5D4 and the EOS R when it comes to which is better for astrophotography. From a practical standpoint though, the 5D4 is probably a little more rugged and better weather sealed, which is important for a lot of the conditions you'll probably be dealing with when doing astrophotography.
I agree.

Your choice of lens or mount are going to make a lot more impact than the choice of camera. Also, look for dark clear skies, there are several websites to point you towards dark skies