A new rumor suggest that the Canon EOS R will be replaced by a Canon EOS R8 [CR1]

mdcmdcmdc

EOS R7, M5, 100 (film), Sony α6400
CR Pro
Sep 4, 2020
245
347
My periodic plea: can we please stop using this term? 1. It's inaccurate and 2. it's gross.
According to Merriam-Webster, it's a perfectly accurate use of the word.


Definition 2 in the verb sense: "to deprive of capability for service or of strength, efficiency, or wholeness"

Your personal definition seems to be rather narrow.
 
Upvote 0

scyrene

EOS R6
Dec 4, 2013
3,166
1,442
UK
www.flickr.com
According to Merriam-Webster, it's a perfectly accurate use of the word.


Definition 2 in the verb sense: "to deprive of capability for service or of strength, efficiency, or wholeness"

Your personal definition seems to be rather narrow.
Well usage defines meaning of course, and plenty of people here use it in this softer sense. So perhaps it's me. Or maybe it's American versus British English. But whatever, to me it is an extreme term - if you cripple an enemy battleship (say), you don't just make it a bit worse. You essentially prevent it from being a threat, you render it practically useless. Also I have observed a creeping expansion of its use on this forum - a few years ago it was a rare term used by a handful (at most) of extreme Canon critics and trolls, now used by lots of folk to mean "they didn't include every feature at the lowest price point". But like I say, to my ear a crippled camera is one that barely functions, not one that is simply less good than another (inevitably more expensive) model.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
Upvote 0

Rule556

I see no reason for recording the obvious. -Weston
Dec 19, 2019
103
104
Seattle
www.flickr.com
any camera named higher than 6 or R6 should be APSC otherwise it'll confuse all. CFE card slot and the spec should put this same as R6 tier, below R5. They can call it R6S i.e. more stills centric.
Came here to say this. I shoot with an R, and I LOVE the body shape and feel, don't need video at all, but want the new AF, IBIS, and a ~30mp sensor. Just make it an Rii and let it be its own weird stills-centric body. Then use the same approach but on the cheap endfor an RPii.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
Upvote 0

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
2,020
2,444
Came here to say this. I shoot with an R, and I LOVE the body shape and feel, don't need video at all, but want the new AF, IBIS, and a ~30mp sensor. Just make it an Rii and let it be its own weird stills-centric body. Then use the same approach but on the cheap endfor an RPii.
Couldn't agree more !
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Upvote 0

unfocused

Photos/Photo Book Reviews: www.thecuriouseye.com
Jul 20, 2010
6,976
5,128
69
Springfield, IL
www.thecuriouseye.com
Well usage defines meaning of course, and plenty of people here use it in this softer sense. So perhaps it's me. Or maybe it's American versus British English. But whatever, to me it is an extreme term - if you cripple an enemy battleship (say), you don't just make it a bit worse. You essentially prevent it from being a threat, you render it practically useless. Also I have observed a creeping expansion of its use on this forum - a few years ago it was a rare term used by a handful (at most) of extreme Canon critics and trolls, now used by lots of folk to mean "they didn't include every feature at the lowest price point". But like I say, to my ear a crippled camera is one that barely functions, not one that is simply less good than another (inevitably more expensive) model.
Quoting a dictionary is not a great source for proper use of words. Since dictionaries contain all words (at least unabridged dictionaries) that means they contain many words that are inappropriate. For actual and appropriate use of a word, I prefer the AP Stylebook. My copy says this of cripple: "Often considered offensive when used to describe a person who is lame or disabled."

Because of the negative social connotations, I agree with you find that cripple grates on my ears.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 4 users
Upvote 0

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
2,020
2,444
Quoting a dictionary is not a great source for proper use of words. Since dictionaries contain all words (at least unabridged dictionaries) that means they contain many words that are inappropriate. For actual and appropriate use of a word, I prefer the AP Stylebook. My copy says this of cripple: "Often considered offensive when used to describe a person who is lame or disabled."

Because of the negative social connotations, I agree with you find that cripple grates on my ears.
And I may add that meanings and social acceptance of words often change. I'm quite convinced that, 100 years ago, to speak of a disabled person as a "cripple" was ok. It, of course, is now insulting. In German, for instance, a "Krüppel" had the same meaning, and is now considered an inacceptable insult too.
Thanks for the "AP Stylebook",I had never heard of it. Amazon will deliver...
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Upvote 0

stevelee

FT-QL
CR Pro
Jul 6, 2017
2,376
1,059
Davidson, NC
And I may add that meanings and social acceptance of words often change. I'm quite convinced that, 100 years ago, to speak of a disabled person as a "cripple" was ok. It, of course, is now insulting. In German, for instance, a "Krüppel" had the same meaning, and is now considered an inacceptable insult too.
Thanks for the "AP Stylebook",I had never heard of it. Amazon will deliver...
Ignore the AP Stylebook on Oxford commas if you care about some level of consistency. It was designed for newspapers, and therefore saving some commas on thousands of copies would mount up in cost of ink. They do allow the comma to be used for clarity if need be, unlike some doctrinaire positions. They will let you avoid implying, as in classic examples, that the pope and Mother Theresa were your parents and that Stalin and JFK were strippers.
 
  • Love
  • Haha
Reactions: 1 users
Upvote 0

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
CR Pro
Aug 9, 2018
2,020
2,444
Ignore the AP Stylebook on Oxford commas if you care about some level of consistency. It was designed for newspapers, and therefore saving some commas on thousands of copies would mount up in cost of ink. They do allow the comma to be used for clarity if need be, unlike some doctrinaire positions. They will let you avoid implying, as in classic examples, that the pope and Mother Theresa were your parents and that Stalin and JFK were strippers.
Thank you for the warning!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users
Upvote 0

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
4,368
2,473
They will let you avoid implying, as in classic examples, that the pope and Mother Theresa were your parents and that Stalin and JFK were strippers.

That might be better than implying The Pope and Mother Theresa were strippers and Stalin and JFK were your parents?
 
Upvote 0