Canon exec confirms that the EOS-1D X Mark III is Canon’s last DSLR

neuroanatomist

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Actually, I have continued purchasing EF (and EF-M) lenses ever since RF was introduced, though I do have an R body :)
I haven’t bought any EF or EF-M since the launch of the RF mount. That’s probably because I already had EF lenses ranging from the 11-24/4L to the 600/4L II and all 8 of the EF-M lenses.

I have bought 5 RF lenses plus the two extenders, and sold the EF lenses they replaced (not the EF extenders, though if the RF versions perform better with my EF 600/4 II then I may sell the EF TCs).
 
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Bishop80

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I haven’t bought any EF or EF-M since the launch of the RF mount. That’s probably because I already had EF lenses ranging from the 11-24/4L to the 600/4L II and all 8 of the EF-M lenses.

I have bought 5 RF lenses plus the two extenders, and sold the EF lenses they replaced (not the EF extenders, though if the RF versions perform better with my EF 600/4 II then I may sell the EF TCs).
Don't get me wrong - I've been tempted to upgrade a few EF lenses to RF. For example, the 50mm f/1.2L is high on my list, as it's not really a good performer wide open. I likely will at some point. I'm just not yet "all in" with RF. Maybe the R1 will push me over the edge, as I'm primarily a 1D shooter. But I occasionally shoot film on a 1V, so I'll always have a handful of EF lenses around for that!
 
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neuroanatomist

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I'm just not yet "all in" with RF. Maybe the R1 will push me over the edge, as I'm primarily a 1D shooter.
As am I. I bought the R and RF 24-105/4L in early 2019. It wasn't until I preordered the R3 that I started swapping lenses. I will keep using several EF lenses with an adapter. For lenses like the 11-24/4L and TS-E 17L, an RF version would need to offer me something major to overcome the advantage of the ability to use the CPL and ND behind the lens instead of a massive front filter. There are rumors of AF TS lenses for the RF mount, but personally my shooting with the TS-E 17 and 24 II are architecture so I have no need for AF. The focus shift in the RF 100L Macro means I'll keep using the EF version – the 1.4x magnification of the RF is nice, but I have the MP-E 65 1-5x if I want more than 1:1.
 
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DanP

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I haven’t bought any EF or EF-M since the launch of the RF mount. That’s probably because I already had EF lenses ranging from the 11-24/4L to the 600/4L II and all 8 of the EF-M lenses.

I have bought 5 RF lenses plus the two extenders, and sold the EF lenses they replaced (not the EF extenders, though if the RF versions perform better with my EF 600/4 II then I may sell the EF TCs).
The RF extenders don’t fit in the adapter (at least not in the basic one - I tried).
 
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neuroanatomist

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The RF extenders don’t fit in the adapter (at least not in the basic one - I tried).
Correct, nor does the drop-in adapter with the wider opening work. I got the Commlite adapter (3rd party one with the widest opening) and used a Dremel to shave it down (persuade it, as @koenkooi says).
 
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AlanF

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Correct, nor does the drop-in adapter with the wider opening work. I got the Commlite adapter (3rd party one with the widest opening) and used a Dremel to shave it down (persuade it, as @koenkooi says).
Is there a chip in the adapter or is there just a network of wires between front and back?
 
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entoman

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200,000 (or higher) shutter rating instead of going backwards to 120,000. Or using a fast enough sensor to do away with a mechanical shutter altogether.

Weather sealing equal to the 7D Mark II.
Shutter ratings are pretty meaningless in my view. My old 5DS clocked up about 250,000 actuations in the 5 years that I owned it, and my 5DMkv is catching up fast, yet both of these have a quoted "play safe" expectancy of 100,000.

Realistically I suspect that the average true life expectancy of almost any modern shutter will exceed 200,000. How many people take more than 20,000 shots a year? Not many, I'd guess. So a shutter will likely last at least 10 years, by which time the camera will almost certainly have been discarded in favour of a "better" model.

With MILCs the situation becomes much more complex - e.g. does an manufacturer's expectation of "150,000" actuations refer to mechanical shutter (open for viewing, then close, then open to begin exposure, then close to end exposure, then re-open for viewing), or to EFCS (open for viewing and start of exposure, close to end exposure, then reopen for viewing)?

Shutter life expectancy will also vary hugely from one user to another, depending on frame speeds chosen, degree of vibration that the camera is subjected to during transportation etc).

.... and with the advent of the Nikon Z9, I think we can expect most future cameras to completely dispense with mechanical and EFCS shutters, at which point the life expectancy of the shutter will basically equal the life expectancy of the sensor and processor (whichever dies first).
 
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entoman

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Those transmissive screens are drawing about as much power as an LCD watch draws.
Correct, but most if not all modern DSLRs are rendered useless without a battery.

Remove it, and the meter will not function.
Ditto for the shutter, which is electronic in virtually all cameras these days.
Ditto for the AF system.
Ditto for the viewfinder, which will become so dark that it becomes unusable.

The OP is chasing rainbows at midnight, if he/she wants an entirely mechanical DSLR.
Possibly an early film SLR might meet their needs better?
 
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entoman

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Didn't they say the same thing about EF lens development a couple or three years ago. Something like, "If the market demands it we will continue to develop and produce new EF lenses?"

How many new EF lenses have been released since that statement was released around the time the EOS R system was introduced in 2018? It's now 2022.
Yes, manufacturers are as full of BS as politicians. They say what they think people want to hear, in order to avoid losing loyal customers.
 
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Czardoom

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The OTHER canon rumor site has an article from Russian sources that more DSLR's are coming.
This thread has also made that pretty clear once people actually took the time to translate the entire quote.

The fact that the site admin has failed to change both the headline and the initial article is, quite frankly, a disgrace.
 
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Michael Clark

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Shutter ratings are pretty meaningless in my view. My old 5DS clocked up about 250,000 actuations in the 5 years that I owned it, and my 5DMkv is catching up fast, yet both of these have a quoted "play safe" expectancy of 100,000.

Realistically I suspect that the average true life expectancy of almost any modern shutter will exceed 200,000. How many people take more than 20,000 shots a year? Not many, I'd guess. So a shutter will likely last at least 10 years, by which time the camera will almost certainly have been discarded in favour of a "better" model.

With MILCs the situation becomes much more complex - e.g. does an manufacturer's expectation of "150,000" actuations refer to mechanical shutter (open for viewing, then close, then open to begin exposure, then close to end exposure, then re-open for viewing), or to EFCS (open for viewing and start of exposure, close to end exposure, then reopen for viewing)?

Shutter life expectancy will also vary hugely from one user to another, depending on frame speeds chosen, degree of vibration that the camera is subjected to during transportation etc).

.... and with the advent of the Nikon Z9, I think we can expect most future cameras to completely dispense with mechanical and EFCS shutters, at which point the life expectancy of the shutter will basically equal the life expectancy of the sensor and processor (whichever dies first).

The shutter ratings from Canon for both the 5D Mark IV and the 5Ds/5Ds R are 150,000, and they tend to exceed that very well. For the 7D Mark II, it was 200,000. Most xD cameras that make it past about 50,000 will last significantly longer than rated, but they're still relative. The x0D series hasn't fared near as well, though. You're statistically about as likely to get 500,000 out of a 200,000 rated 7D Mark II as you are to get 150,000 out of a 100,000 rated 70D or 80D.

I average well over 50K per year with my 7D Mark II shooting mostly sports with my longest lens. My 5D Mark IV gets well less than half that annually shooting pretty much everything else plus providing a body for my 'wide' lens when shooting sports. So yes, where I need it the most, the 90D provides the least.
 
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Michael Clark

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Correct, but most if not all modern DSLRs are rendered useless without a battery.

Remove it, and the meter will not function.
Ditto for the shutter, which is electronic in virtually all cameras these days.
Ditto for the AF system.
Ditto for the viewfinder, which will become so dark that it becomes unusable.

The OP is chasing rainbows at midnight, if he/she wants an entirely mechanical DSLR.
Possibly an early film SLR might meet their needs better?

The point is, it would take at least several months for the transmissive screen to drain a fully charged LP-E6. Watch batteries have much less total energy than an LP-E6 does, and they last 2-3 years in digital watches pulling about the same current (more if you use the watch's backlight or alarm very much). I get my 50D out about once every two years and test it. The smaller BP-511 batteries stored with it still have some charge left, and they're all over a decade old and haven't been used much since about 2012.
 
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