Show your Bird Portraits

Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
13,906
2,024
Canada
Excellent series, usern4cr.
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bhf3737

---
CR Pro
Sep 9, 2015
618
1,236
Calgary, Canada
www.flickr.com
He certainly is! We don’t have these beautiful birds in the UK.
Thanks Alan
This time of year, they show up, usually in groups of 10 or more. Unfortunately this spring there are only two of them here. Perhaps because of unusually dry winter. Many of the wetland ponds, that they build their nest, are dry. I hope that this is only a passing phase and does not affect the survival of these beautiful birds.
 
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macrunning

Enjoying the Ride
Feb 12, 2021
53
116
WA
Now that Spring has finally arrived here in the PNW we are starting to get a nice variety of birds. This little Pine Siskin decided to drop in yesterday. They are hard to distinguish from the female House Finch. The beak is the giveaway but you can also spot a bit of yellow on the Pine Siskin's wings.
Pine Siskin - K1A8686.jpg
 

usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
928
1,211
Kentucky, USA
Just love the color of the Cardinals. Great Shots usern4cr
Thank you, Click & macrunning.
I'm getting better at using PL4 as time goes on. These aren't my latest "post" efforts, and I think my latest are getting more "natural" looking while still bringing out a nice color and brightness - but I'm trying not to overdo it as I did sometimes not too long ago. So many of the photos I take have dark (to silhouette) subjects on bright or bokeh-wise noisy backgrounds that it's really hard to pull a "pretty photo" out of them.
 

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,748
8,458
Thank you, Click & macrunning.
I'm getting better at using PL4 as time goes on. These aren't my latest "post" efforts, and I think my latest are getting more "natural" looking while still bringing out a nice color and brightness - but I'm trying not to overdo it as I did sometimes not too long ago. So many of the photos I take have dark (to silhouette) subjects on bright or bokeh-wise noisy backgrounds that it's really hard to pull a "pretty photo" out of them.
There seem to be two approaches - enhancing colours vs natural colouring. I always try to have the colours as lifelike as I can remember. Here are some of my Northern Cardinals I took on one of my USA trips (all with the 100-400mm II + 5DSR) - had my second Pfizer today so with luck there will be more trips across the pond soon.


NorthernCardinaFemale_3Q7A3186-DxO-reduced.jpg
NorthernCardinal_3Q7A3145-DxO.jpg
NorthernCardinal_3Q7A3194-DxO_reduced.jpg
CardinalsCopulating_3Q7A3190-DxO_reduced.jpg
 

usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
928
1,211
Kentucky, USA
There seem to be two approaches - enhancing colours vs natural colouring. I always try to have the colours as lifelike as I can remember. Here are some of my Northern Cardinals I took on one of my USA trips (all with the 100-400mm II + 5DSR) - had my second Pfizer today so with luck there will be more trips across the pond soon.


View attachment 196778 View attachment 196779 View attachment 196780 View attachment 196781
Beautiful photos, Alan.

The male Northern cardinals I have here are almost too saturated to start with, as they're almost a bright red ball in the photo without any processing - so solid bright red that it's often hard to see the feather contrast. The females aren't as bright, but have a great variety of different colors (not wood-duck colors but still about as colorful as I'll get around here). The Carolina wren is really colorful inherently, as are the male House finches that have a very deep red head & neck area. But there are a lot of other birds that look like, ... , well ordinary birds. That's not a bad thing, but my birds in view are usually in the shaded part of the tree which makes them not nearly as pretty or colorful as they could be - which is where I try to pull out their color even if they're dark with a brighter background further off.

Yesterday my wife and I went out for the first time (this year) on a long nature hike and I took some "birding" photos of a large bird at the top of a tree really high up, and another was of a woodpecker up high & very far away (with no access to get closer). The RF 100-500L also excels at taking close up photos of the small wild flowers (with big background blur) that were all around, which is one of the amazing thing about that lens and the biggest reason I bought it - it's so versatile.
 
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AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,748
8,458
Beautiful photos, Alan.

The male Northern cardinals I have here are almost too saturated to start with, as they're almost a bright red ball in the photo without any processing - so solid bright red that it's often hard to see the feather contrast. The females aren't as bright, but have a great variety of different colors (not wood-duck colors but still about as colorful as I'll get around here). The Carolina wren is really colorful inherently, as are the male House finches that have a very deep red head & neck area. But there are a lot of other birds that look like, ... , well ordinary birds. That's not a bad thing, but my birds in view are usually in the shaded part of the tree which makes them not nearly as pretty or colorful as they could be - which is where I try to pull out their color even if they're dark with a brighter background further off.

Yesterday my wife and I went out for the first time (this year) on a long nature hike and I took some "birding" photos of a large bird at the top of a tree really high up, and another was of a woodpecker up high & very far away (with no access to get closer). The RF 100-500L also excels at taking close up photos of the small wild flowers (with big background blur) that were all around, which is one of the amazing thing about that lens and the biggest reason I bought it - it's so versatile.
For the likes of us, the 100-500mm is perfect - light enough to carry on long hikes, sharp and can take close ups and zoom out. Mind you, the 100-400mm II is in the same league, and I am hanging on to my old lens to go with the 5DSR as my second camera and my wife finds it easy to use.
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
CR Pro
Apr 30, 2017
1,258
2,524
Bing has a handy website tool to look up varieties of birds. Just add your image and Bing will attempt to local similar images. This generally has links to websites with the type of bird. This is what I typically do when trying to find out the name of a bird. https://www.bing.com/visualsearch
Interesting! I have to check this - at least for a birds that I have no idea what they are! On other hand - I have seen plenty of misidentified photos on the Internet and you easily can get in trouble... Sometimes the differences are so small and the info in the photo is just not enough.
I still think there is nothing better of few good books and careful reading (few books because in every book you may find some small things that can help you in case of doubt!).
Just for example: I don't believe a real ornithologist will use Bing to ID a bird:ROFLMAO:! It needs more than Bing. On other hand Bing I hope can help you to narrow the scope of your search if you use it with grayn of salt and... well you are again in the teritory of the good books!
 
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