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Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
14,727
3,597
Canada
Double-crested Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant.jpg
 

usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
1,206
2,057
Kentucky, USA
It also helps if people leave the Exif data and not strip it out. I always state the camera and lens, and have the Exif data so those interested can download the image and read it.
Hmmm ... I didn't think about downloading the image to see the Exif data. That's a good idea! Thanks, AlanF.
 

macrunning

Enjoying the Ride
Feb 12, 2021
172
442
WA
They look like a moire style false pattern issue due to specific interactions of shutter speed/readout speed and subject motion that are being exaggerated by sharpening to me. What do they look like with all sharpening turned off?
You can notice it in the raw file before post production but obviously sharpening is going to amplify this. It pretty much only seems to happen with BIF type photos so I'm sure it has to do with the sensor readout. I'm usually shooting 1/3200th or faster with BIF photos in electronic shutter. Honestly just trying to find out if others are running into this problem or if it's just my camera. Since I've already had technical issues with the R5 I'm not feeling as confident with the quality of my particular camera. I hope I'm wrong.
 

privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
10,487
5,705
You can notice it in the raw file before post production but obviously sharpening is going to amplify this. It pretty much only seems to happen with BIF type photos so I'm sure it has to do with the sensor readout. I'm usually shooting 1/3200th or faster with BIF photos in electronic shutter. Honestly just trying to find out if others are running into this problem or if it's just my camera. Since I've already had technical issues with the R5 I'm not feeling as confident with the quality of my particular camera. I hope I'm wrong.
Well I’d do some specific repeatable tests. Something like stick a birds feather onto a fan, turntable, etc that rotates at a known speed, then go through your shutter speeds. If it is only 3,200th and up I’d test in electronic and mechanical and if you aren’t happy with the results, tell Canon, or better yet beg borrow or steal another R5 and see if the results are the same.

In the meantime I’d remove the sharpening from the worst affected areas and try hard not to let it get to me, nobody else will really notice it!
 
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ISO64

EOS M6 Mark II
Jul 2, 2015
98
298
You can notice it in the raw file before post production but obviously sharpening is going to amplify this. It pretty much only seems to happen with BIF type photos so I'm sure it has to do with the sensor readout. I'm usually shooting 1/3200th or faster with BIF photos in electronic shutter. Honestly just trying to find out if others are running into this problem or if it's just my camera. Since I've already had technical issues with the R5 I'm not feeling as confident with the quality of my particular camera. I hope I'm wrong.
Quick test, and it is repeatable: hang a load using white thin string so it can sway in front of dark background. Set up a strong light, or do it outside. Prefocus on string beforehand, turn off AF. Sway it, fire max fps at different exposure times, let Auto ISO work. Notes on no sharpening apply. Good luck!
 

Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
14,727
3,597
Canada
Thanks, Click. Also, I've never seen such vivid variety of colors as on Wood Ducks from others who post here, and now your lovely photo reminds me of how stunning those birds are. I haven't been enough of a birder to want to track down certain birds just to see them, but I think I'd enjoy the effort to see some Wood Ducks myself one day.

Sorry for the late reply. Yes, Wood Ducks are amazingly colorful birds, they're just beautiful. Thank you for your kind comment, I really appreciate it.
 
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AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
8,661
11,576
Came home to get a quick glimpse of a strange bird and fortunately had the R5 in hand to get a quick shot. It's actually a juvenile Eurasian Robin with just the top of its fledgling feathers left and the the adult ones coming through.

309A0593-DxO_Juvenile_Robin-2_00x.jpg