USD pricing for the Canon EOS R6 Mark II and Canon RF 135mm f/1.8L IS USM has leaked ahead of the imminent announcement

so far Canon sells each one they manage to make, so I 'd say it is underpriced still
I’ve been ignoring dumb comments like that lately. I’m so sick of people constantly saying stuff like that and not a peep about the A7IV being disappointing and the A7V being basically a two year old R5 for the same price, worse auto focus and still worse IBIS.
 
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Aussie shooter

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because for stacked (or non stacked) sensors the cost is not in development but in manufacturing ... 1DxII / 1DxIII sensor (a little tuned 1DxII sensor paired with better processor) was cheap to make, the price of that camera was because of the camera itself and its position in the lineup, not because its sensor cost was 3/4 of the camera price - so cheap FSI old sensor (which dates really to 1DxII time) made its way into cheap camera (R6) ... even Sony Semi which makes way more stacked sensors for much longer than Canon can't make them cheap enough and Canon managed to put just one stacked sensor into production dSLM while Sony Semi makes A1, Z9, A9 - several marks, X-H2S, OM-1
So exactly what is the price difference between a stacked and non stacked sensor? And is it so much that it would make reusing one economically unviable?
 
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esglord

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May 9, 2019
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Canon will sell as many R3’s as they can at a high price to those unwilling to wait. When they’ve met that demand, they will drop the price and hit the next group of buyers and sell more units at the lower margin, thereby maximizing their average profit margin over time and getting close to the maximum that each individual purchaser is willing to pay. Market segmentation. A discounted mk I will extract value from customers who were never willing to pay $2500 while Mk ii maintains the original profit margin for a different consumer that is willing to pay more for a bit more resolution, again maximizing profit per sale. It’s a time tested pricing model with little difference from offering matinee and senior discounts at the movie theater.
 
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Uneternal

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Jan 25, 2016
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Some people don't realize how much work is done to come up with such business decisions. There were probably hundreds of people working behind the scene, both internal and many external consultants and massive data and analysis to come up with the price they decided - it's not like few executives fiddling their thumbs and go.. hmm I think $2,500 is the right price.
Some people don't realize that too many cooks can spoil the broth. And having a lot of people aiding your business decisions doesn't mean you're making better decisions than some people in a forum (who have decades of experience). See Kodak, see Nokia, see Meta, see Samsung's camera department.
A lot of times, in such huge businesses the head doesn't know what the tail does, Managers are often out of contact with the demand of customers and probably should read what people have to say here. Also, in the end it's always up to 1 person to say we go with this or that, it's not like Canon's marketing did a voting and most employees voted for $2500. In the case of Nokia, the assessment of just 1 person brought the world's biggest cellphone manufacturer to fall.
Therefore, dismissing opinions here with the argument "their assessments are better than yours" IMO is just arrogant fanboyism.
 
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neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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See Kodak, see Nokia, see Meta, see Samsung's camera department.

Therefore, dismissing opinions here with the argument "their assessments are better than yours" IMO is just arrogant fanboyism.
See Apple, Coca-Cola, IBM, Intel, AT&T, Sony, General Mills, Toyota, Honda, Merck, Caterpillar, Honeywell, Cisco, 3M, and far too many other well-run companies to name.

Could you be correct about Canon’s R6II pricing strategy and Canon be wrong about it? Certainly, but the odds against it are extraordinarily high.

Basing a conclusion on a very small number of notable exceptions IMO is just asinine.
 
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Jayk0607

I'm New Here
May 27, 2020
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Some people don't realize that too many cooks can spoil the broth. And having a lot of people aiding your business decisions doesn't mean you're making better decisions than some people in a forum (who have decades of experience). See Kodak, see Nokia, see Meta, see Samsung's camera department.
A lot of times, in such huge businesses the head doesn't know what the tail does, Managers are often out of contact with the demand of customers and probably should read what people have to say here. Also, in the end it's always up to 1 person to say we go with this or that, it's not like Canon's marketing did a voting and most employees voted for $2500. In the case of Nokia, the assessment of just 1 person brought the world's biggest cellphone manufacturer to fall.
Therefore, dismissing opinions here with the argument "their assessments are better than yours" IMO is just arrogant fanboyism.
Not all decisions are right. You only listed somewhat failed businesses but I can also list lots of successful business with 'too many cooks'. Also I believe Samsung's decision was to focus on mobile, which they thrive in. You mentioned decades of experience and my comments being fanboyism - I have decades of experience in accounting/finance/business planning/budgeting in fortune 500 companies and big 4 accounting firms and have hands on experience with such business decisions. Regardless of how you personally think, that's how large businesses are run. They require data to back up their decisions.
 
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scyrene

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Dec 4, 2013
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Some people don't realize that too many cooks can spoil the broth. And having a lot of people aiding your business decisions doesn't mean you're making better decisions than some people in a forum (who have decades of experience). See Kodak, see Nokia, see Meta, see Samsung's camera department.
A lot of times, in such huge businesses the head doesn't know what the tail does, Managers are often out of contact with the demand of customers and probably should read what people have to say here. Also, in the end it's always up to 1 person to say we go with this or that, it's not like Canon's marketing did a voting and most employees voted for $2500. In the case of Nokia, the assessment of just 1 person brought the world's biggest cellphone manufacturer to fall.
Therefore, dismissing opinions here with the argument "their assessments are better than yours" IMO is just arrogant fanboyism.
Kodak/Nokia klaxon! "fanboy" klaxon! You know best, everyone disagreeing is arrogant! You just forgot the D-word :ROFLMAO:
 
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Johnw

EOS R6
Oct 10, 2020
108
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it's not like Canon's marketing did a voting and most employees voted for $2500

Why would you presume that a majority vote of the employees would be a reliable method for a corporation to set the price of a product? That’s rather delusional. Do the people in tech support or HR have relevant experience in marketing research or demand assessment? Probably not. Obviously it would be logical for the employees with the relevant domain experience to make that decision.

Even within the marketing department, the decision obviously should not be made based on what a majority of the employees think or want, but on what the market data is indicating. If a single employee presents a better read on the market data to a marketing director, a good leader certainly can go with that even if numerous others think differently.

As I’ve stated elsewhere, the process by which a corporation sets a product’s price generally has to do with assessing market demand at different price points and then determining what price point will maximize revenue for the corp (and profit factoring in the margins they project to achieve). This means that the price of $2500 for the R6 was likely set even before the final technical design was completely finished. Since the Mark II seems to be only a modest technical update over the original, it makes complete sense that Canon’s original market research or a modest update to it still holds that $2500 is the best price point.
 
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Until they run out :))

@esglord They will never ever run out. Refurb direct from Canon will still be selling the R6 in 2027, at the very least, and probably till end of decade. Brand new 6DII bodies are still being sold by Canon (at just 25% discount off launch price!), and that camera is from 2017. You have all the time in the world.
 
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Kit.

EOS 5D Mark IV
Apr 25, 2011
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Some people don't realize that too many cooks can spoil the broth. And having a lot of people aiding your business decisions doesn't mean you're making better decisions than some people in a forum (who have decades of experience). See Kodak, see Nokia, see Meta, see Samsung's camera department.
A lot of times, in such huge businesses the head doesn't know what the tail does, Managers are often out of contact with the demand of customers and probably should read what people have to say here. Also, in the end it's always up to 1 person to say we go with this or that, it's not like Canon's marketing did a voting and most employees voted for $2500. In the case of Nokia, the assessment of just 1 person brought the world's biggest cellphone manufacturer to fall.
Therefore, dismissing opinions here with the argument "their assessments are better than yours" IMO is just arrogant fanboyism.
I have decades of experience in arguing on the forums. Can we just assume that everything I say is right, or else "see Kodak"?
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
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My Guess (just guessing)...line is looking like:
24Mpx line: R6 II enthusiast and R3 pro line (stacked sensor)
I think you're underestimating the R6/R6ii by referring to them as only "enthusiast" models. They may well be in the enthusiast price band, but there are plenty of pros using the R6, either as their main body, or as a secondary body to a R5 or R3.
 
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Kit.

EOS 5D Mark IV
Apr 25, 2011
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With all this talk about stacked sensors, wouldn’t we all be pleased if the R6ii just moves from the current CMOS sensor to BSI CMOS?
What's the point? It has 6 μm pixel pitch. Plenty of space to put the front-side electronics where it doesn't get illuminated through the microlenses.
 
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