Breakthrough Photography announces the all-new EF to RF filter adapter

Canon Rumors Guy

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www.canonrumors.com
September 16, 2020 – San Francisco, California – Breakthrough Filters today introduced an all-new EF to RF filter adapter, making it the first non-Canon EF to RF drop-in filter adapter. The new EF to RF Drop-In Filter Adapter will start shipping on November 16th and is available for pre-order here.

The all-new EF to RF Drop-In Filter Adapter delivers a number of new hardware improvements including Autofocus, Image Stabilization, full EXIF support, all-metal construction, dust, and water-resistant weather-sealing, and a detachable tripod foot for mounting to ballheads, arca plates and other mounts.
Breakthrough Filters is selling the new drop-in filter adapter for $199, and the first 500 units ordered will receive an X4 Clear for free.
Breakthrough Filters is also doing a buyback for the standard Canon EF to RF adapter ($69) as well as the Canon Drop-In filter adapter ($149) with details on their website about how this works.
For more information...
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Kit.

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I wonder if it's possible to make an adapter with both a drop-in filter and a control ring/wheel.
 
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degos

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Buy-back for the basic Canon adapter at $69, genius when they're in short supply and listing for $160+ on eBay.
 

DBounce

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a number of new hardware improvements including Autofocus, Image Stabilization, full EXIF support, all-metal construction, dust, and water-resistant weather-sealing, and a detachable tripod foot for mounting to ballheads”

I think the only thing on this list that the Canon does not include is the detachable foot. And I’ll bet the AF works better with the Canon one.
 
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juststeve

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As has been stated many times previously, the electrical contacts of the EF-RF adapters are straight pass through. There are no electrical components involved. Autofocus performance will be the same as with the Canon adapters.
 

Famateur

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a number of new hardware improvements including Autofocus, Image Stabilization, full EXIF support, all-metal construction, dust, and water-resistant weather-sealing, and a detachable tripod foot for mounting to ballheads”

I think the only thing on this list that the Canon does not include is the detachable foot. And I’ll bet the AF works better with the Canon one.
I could be wrong, but I think these adapters (both Canon and third-party) simply provide the metal contacts to connect lens contacts to body contacts. There is no processing or circuitry in the adapter itself. As long as the contacts touch firmly, AF should be exactly the same, regardless of the adapter maker. I guess it's possible that Canon does have some circuitry to tell the camera that it's made by Canon so that if a third party adapter is attached, the camera dumbs down the AF, but I highly doubt it.

Anyone know for sure?

EDIT: Looks like you answered my question as I was posting it. Thanks, juststeve!
 
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Famateur

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So...I'm assuming the clear filter is to close up the adapter for weather/dust sealing when you don't need a polarizing or ND filter. Is there any other use for it? Why do they use clear glass instead of just an empty frame? Or is the glass in the filter part of the weather sealing?

The standard and control ring adapters don't have glass, though, so...what's the deal?

I'd be tempted to remove the glass from the clear filter so I don't have anything that could reduce image quality from the lens...
 
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bbasiaga

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Why would someone buy this company's $199 Drop-In Filter Adapter and sell their $299 Canon adapter to this place for $149? Is it that much better?
I think that if you're already invested, there is no good reason to do that. Save maybe the tripod foot option. I think the buyback thing is mainly to get people to switch at less of a cost. Once you have it, they're betting you'll buy more filters.

If you haven't bought one yet, then you can get their version cheaper. And even then get credit for your basic adapter. Then once you have it, you'll probably buy more filters....

-Brian
 

Kit.

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So...I'm assuming the clear filter is to close up the adapter for weather/dust sealing when you don't need a polarizing or ND filter. Is there any other use for it? Why do they use clear glass instead of just an empty frame? Or is the glass in the filter part of the weather sealing?

The standard and control ring adapters don't have glass, though, so...what's the deal?

I'd be tempted to remove the glass from the clear filter so I don't have anything that could reduce image quality from the lens...
Glass is changing the focusing distance (especially for wide-angle lenses). Clear glass is used to change it for the same amount as the actual filter would.
 

keithcooper

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CR Pro
So...I'm assuming the clear filter is to close up the adapter for weather/dust sealing when you don't need a polarizing or ND filter. Is there any other use for it? Why do they use clear glass instead of just an empty frame? Or is the glass in the filter part of the weather sealing?

The standard and control ring adapters don't have glass, though, so...what's the deal?

I'd be tempted to remove the glass from the clear filter so I don't have anything that could reduce image quality from the lens...
I've been looking at the Canon adapter, and the problem is that when you don't want a filter, then there is a big hole to let in light.
I think I'd also prefer a blank filterless holder just for sealing. Whilst having glass reduces focus change, I'd not mind refocusing but YMMV

If anyone's curious, here's a short look at using the adapter with a TS-E17mm. BTW Has anyone actually checked the electrical connection between EF and RF on the basic adapter, since the number of pins is different?

 
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degos

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Glass is changing the focusing distance (especially for wide-angle lenses). Clear glass is used to change it for the same amount as the actual filter would.
Only for lenses designed with drop-in filters ( like big whites ) in which the filter acts as a dust-cover for the rear lens element.

For other lenses there is no need for a glass filter. In fact you'd be better without one on account of the optical defects it could introduce.
 

koenkooi

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Only for lenses designed with drop-in filters ( like big whites ) in which the filter acts as a dust-cover for the rear lens element.

For other lenses there is no need for a glass filter. In fact you'd be better without one on account of the optical defects it could introduce.
I think it was in an interview with Rudy Winston where he mentioned that the adapter is slightly different from the others to account for the extra glass you're introducing. I wonder if that can actually be measured at home with callipers.
 

weixing

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Only for lenses designed with drop-in filters ( like big whites ) in which the filter acts as a dust-cover for the rear lens element.

For other lenses there is no need for a glass filter. In fact you'd be better without one on account of the optical defects it could introduce.
The filter is install between the lens rear element and the sensor, so the filter actually change the back focus distance of the lens (if you compare all the EF to EOS R adapter, you'll notice that the Drop-In Filter EF-EOS R adapter is slightly longer), so if you use the Drop-In Filter EF-EOS R adapter, you'll need to insert a clear filter even if you don't need to use any filter. This is also the reason why if you mod your camera to remove the low pass or IR blocking filter of the sensor, you need to replace a clear filter with the same thickness.
 
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snappy604

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Hopefully the filter doesn't randomly fall out like the Canon one does, I was very disappointment in my canon one.
for real? yikes

I want an EF to RF adapter and would prefer having options but hte cost + the canon solution needing to have a filter always in made me hesitate... this seems to fit the bill, but haven't heard if its any good.

would love a polarizer and ND.. but wasn't clear how much the adapter itself is, just the filters.
 
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XL+

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I love the idea to own an filtersystem, where I own a lot of different filters. Not different in diameter, but different in function and effect.
The new adapters from canon do offer an polarizer or an ND. So I ordered it. But you need another 100 Euro Filter (clear) to use this adapter as an normal adapter and not only with the polarizer indside. And the clear filter has still not arrived. So an very expensive system for me. (BTW because of this missing clear filtert, another adapter had to be bought). Expensive again. Now I own three adapters - I got the third one as an giveaway.

But my question to breakthrough-photography - that had not be answered by now - is, if I need the breakthrough adapter to use their filters. An shop answered my question and adviced to buy the breakthrough adapter. Not good, as an non-geniune adapter always has the danger not to work like the genuine one from Canon.

BTW: The 200€ polarizer drop-in filter is optically dark and working well, but the wheel is smooth and the postion changes easily. There my older prime 52mm drop in filters for the 600 II and 500 II are better constructed. too bad...
 

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