Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses

Codebunny

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Sep 5, 2018
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I guess 400mm DO was too cheap ,they want rather sell same weighting 500mm DO for 15k :p

I am not 100% sure, but I recall to some level of certainty that the DO and PF lens elements are hard or take a long time to make and that is why at least Nikon build 300s and 500s in alternating batches. Perhaps Canon has to free up the DO glass for new RF lenses?

Come to think of it, is this perhaps a reason for the 600 and 800 being f/11? Or even some attempt to scale up DO glass production for the big whites.
 
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pape2

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I am not 100% sure, but I recall to some level of certainty that the DO and PF lens elements are hard or take a long time to make and that is why at least Nikon build 300s and 500s in alternating batches. Perhaps Canon has to free up the DO glass for new RF lenses?

Come to think of it, is this perhaps a reason for the 600 and 800 being f/11? Or even some attempt to scale up DO glass production for the big whites.
Yep they could have only one production line for big fresnell lenses , 500mm lense is prolly bit larger so cant produce both same time.
RF 600 and 800mm fresnel lenses are same diameter maybe they can be made on same production line?
 
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slclick

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Dec 17, 2013
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EF lenses will continue to work and produce fantastic images (in the right hands) no matter what follows. G.A.S. infected shooters may chose to disagree. The used market is a wonderful thing for new and aspiring photographers on a budget and the RF lineup has done an incredible service to businesses such as Keh.com and the like. It's a great time for gear choices and pricepoints.
 
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AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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I am not 100% sure, but I recall to some level of certainty that the DO and PF lens elements are hard or take a long time to make and that is why at least Nikon build 300s and 500s in alternating batches. Perhaps Canon has to free up the DO glass for new RF lenses?

Come to think of it, is this perhaps a reason for the 600 and 800 being f/11? Or even some attempt to scale up DO glass production for the big whites.
The f/11 lenses are clearly dirt cheap to make, relatively speaking, and provide a nice entry for long telephotos - they are about a tenth of the initial price of the 400mm DO II. Canon's growth strategy is to open up new markets as the old ones are just treading water at best and mainly declining. The first R series weren't as good as the best Canon DSLRs but the R5 and R6 have leapt ahead and so Canon has the ammunition to make us want to buy RF lenses for them. They don't have unlimited production resources so it's goodbye to EF.
 

Stuart

Hi, Welcome from an ePhotozine fan, & 6D user.
Jul 22, 2010
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Mass lens discontinuations strike me as being premature. It shows contempt for their DSLR users.
It might seem off that you can't keep buying new lenses for old camera bodies. But lenses seem to outlast camera bodies so its likely reputable second hand and old stock options would be around for a good few years yet.

Also Canon does want up to follow them up the RF route, in the same way they had people follow them in the last mount change.

Not many manufacturers keep making spares forever for old devices. Especially when 3rd party lenses are also very good options.

I'm still on EF, but don't want to spend on EF glass before I get a suitably priced/performing RF body - Happyish to save money in the middle ground for now and dream of my possible RF future one day.
 

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
Absolutely. But there's a difference.

Canon EF lenses are fully compatible with both DSLRs and their older 35mm EOS film systems, something you can't replicate with their new RF system unless you use an adapter (I prefer not to).

That's a big leap for millions of camera owners that have invested a ton in EF lenses. It's not as smooth as the previous technological change.

I actually expect Canon APS-C cameras and lenses to gain value. There's simply nothing to compete with them in Canonland once you factor in their bargain price when buying them used and the HUGE selection of lenses available.
I’m guessing you’re maybe not old enough to remember the FD to EF change in 1987. That time there was no way to adapt to the new system, and although Canon had made a serious stab at the ‘pro’ market with the F-1 it took them two years after the introduction of EF before they offered a ‘pro’ EF body in the form of the EOS 1.

Yes it’s true that even the latest (and indeed third party) EF lenses work perfectly on the EOS film bodies from the 80s & 90s which is a testament to the original design.

Given how many higher end EF DSLRs are out there I suppose it is possible that used prices might go up if people still want DSLRs and new lenses are not available. Canon are certainly banking on a sea chance to RF and actually appear to be forcing the issue. Maybe this will breath new life into Pentax sales as that company has stated it will continue with DSLRs. I see Nikon as the influencer here now and it will be interesting to see what they do next regarding a D850 replacement.
 

EduPortas

EOS 90D
Jul 1, 2015
113
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I’m guessing you’re maybe not old enough to remember the FD to EF change in 1987.

Oh I remember well, my friend. But I didn't cite that example because it was not relevant to this situation: we have some degree of compatibility between EF and RF systems but it's not ideal. Otherwise, Canon wouldn't be forcing this change.

There's some overlap between this two systems and that is where I expect DSLR APS-C users to carve and interesting niche, specially considering Canon have all but given up on the EOS-M experiment.

It's astounding that even after seven years Canon have no real substitute for ye old 7DM2. So there's a niche right there.
 

CanonFanBoy

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Mass lens discontinuations strike me as being premature. It shows contempt for their DSLR users.
Jeepers, dude. It is no more a sign of contempt than Ford discontinuing the Model T. I mean, you got what you paid for when you purchased. Which lens, exactly, were you saving for that made the list? So many conspiracy mavens around these days. Canon had contempt for customers, so terminates a product line because Canon hates the customer? Get real.
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
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I think size and weight is a very good reason to switch lenses to newer ones. Sharpness is also often better and AF is even faster (though all my EF L lenses work fine with the adapter).

Whether or not an RF lens improves on the IQ of an EF version seems to depend on when the last EF update appeared. The super fast primes? Much sharper. The L zooms? IQ is pretty much the same, though Canon is trying to add a new feature where ever they can (100-500 instead of 400; IS; collapsing design).
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
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Not in my opinion. My gear has to pay for itself, a few ounces at the cost of $1,000’s doesn’t cut it. Sharpness is vastly overrated and none of my current lenses lack it. AF of my current setup is only limited by me.

For some people yes, for me and I suspect quite a few others, the cost of transitioning from EF to RF simply isn’t worth it at this point.

For stills there is nothing lacking in my current kit. There are lenses I would like to add but there's nothing I can't do, they would just be fun to have. What's lacking is opportunity to use my equipment.

Video is another story, but if I were to add an R6 I would not be adding RF lenses. I would be using my EF lenses via adapter, possibly one of the filtered adapters.
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
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I too think the prices of used EF lenses will go up. That has always been the case where I live.

It will depend on the lens in question. But I bet some lenses will spike in price, at least initially.
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
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I think Canon was forced to concentrate their capacities on RF lenses due to the COVID related production crises.

COVID has had multiple impacts and supply chain issues might be the least important. Camera sales were already in steep decline before the pandemic thanks to cell phones dominating the low end. (The impact on P&S and entry level ILCs is obvious. But there's also the fact that many people who stick to their phones will never get 'the itch' to treat photography as a serious hobby and move up.) Camera sales have now practically collapsed due to the economic impact. I can't imagine lens sales are doing any better.

Now add the people dumping equipment on the used market because they need the money and/or because they're just not using it any more. Vacations are down, weddings are down, wedding budgets are down, and I personally know a good wedding photographer who has transitioned to baking. You read that right. The market for good pies and desserts has been better than the market for wedding photography.

And it's not over. The global economy is set to get worse before it gets better. Certain markets may be booming (housing; stocks; crypto) but that's because printed currency tends to find its way into those markets despite government's best efforts. They bubble fast, but they collapse much faster.

We should probably be grateful at this point that Canon is not in Nikon's position financially.
 
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IcyBergs

I have a Sony...TV
May 31, 2016
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This is great news. I am very happy to live in the discontinued EF universe. The lenses are going to be bargains as people dump them because? Well no real reason at all...
I guess everyone's mileage varies. I personally haven't seen the dramatic EF bargains of half-off that some are claiming to have saved versus new. Not saying that hasn't happened but where I live the private party second hand market has been good to me as a seller.

I recently decided to sell my least used lenses (100L & 16-35 f/4L) I was able to fetch more combined for these used lenses than I paid for them new years ago.

The recent spike in MSRP for the 100L ($929 to $1299 USD) certainly aided in my cause, as I sold mine for approximately $50 more than I paid new, but was able to sell the ultrawide for only $40 less than I paid new.

So depending on the lenses you are looking to sell, and perhaps more importantly (WHEN you purchased) it could be more a sellers market than a what seems like a ripe buyers market.
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
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Maybe somebody has asked this question - if so, I missed it - but what do you mean by "officially?" Do we have an actual statement from Canon? Do we have actual sellers reporting that Canon has told them these lenses are being discontinued? Or are you just speculating that "Sold out" or "Unavailable" means discontinued? That seems to be the most important question that should be answered.

With all the hand wringing (including by me) I wonder this as well. Not to knock CR or any other rumors site, but "official" means a statement or list from Canon that we can view, or sites like B&H labeling them as such. A few lenses on this list are "official." But some don't make much sense, and the bulk of the list is marked in stock every where you look.

Doesn't mean CR is wrong as the list could be something only dealers are meant to see.
 

CanonFanBoy

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Jan 28, 2015
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COVID has had multiple impacts and supply chain issues might be the least important. Camera sales were already in steep decline before the pandemic thanks to cell phones dominating the low end. (The impact on P&S and entry level ILCs is obvious. But there's also the fact that many people who stick to their phones will never get 'the itch' to treat photography as a serious hobby and move up.) Camera sales have now practically collapsed due to the economic impact. I can't imagine lens sales are doing any better.

Now add the people dumping equipment on the used market because they need the money and/or because they're just not using it any more. Vacations are down, weddings are down, wedding budgets are down, and I personally know a good wedding photographer who has transitioned to baking. You read that right. The market for good pies and desserts has been better than the market for wedding photography.

And it's not over. The global economy is set to get worse before it gets better. Certain markets may be booming (housing; stocks; crypto) but that's because printed currency tends to find its way into those markets despite government's best efforts. They bubble fast, but they collapse much faster.

We should probably be grateful at this point that Canon is not in Nikon's position financially.
Cake, pie, biscuits, and potatoes.... My pacifiers during the pandemic, and the cause of 70 extra pounds in the past year. :(
 
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