Mushrooms And Fungi Of Any Kind

LeBlobe

EOS RP
Nov 9, 2020
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Montreal, Canada
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18 shots
Canon EOS RP
Canon RF 35mm f/1.8 IS STM

0.4s / f7.1 / iso 125
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
CR Pro
Apr 30, 2017
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Thanks for the "(y)"! It seems you like the fungi from the Genus Cortinarius - even the image at your account is a Cortinarius. They are beautiful and very dangerous (some are edible and good but very hard to ID correctly): if in Amanitas (like the Death cap) you may have 24-72h latent period before you start feeling the poisoning (in the same time the toxins of the fungus are making crap of your liver!!!). With the Cortinarius this period is much longer - as long as that there is no way back!
On other hand they are really nice for photos (as you prove it)!
 

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
CR Pro
Nov 7, 2013
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Thanks for the "(y)"! It seems you like the fungi from the Genus Cortinarius - even the image at your account is a Cortinarius. They are beautiful and very dangerous (some are edible and good but very hard to ID correctly): if in Amanitas (like the Death cap) you may have 24-72h latent period before you start feeling the poisoning (in the same time the toxins of the fungus are making crap of your liver!!!). With the Cortinarius this period is much longer - as long as that there is no way back!
On other hand they are really nice for photos (as you prove it)!
sounds yummy! :sick:
So I will continue to consume your wonderful pictures (#3 is my fav), (y)
and keep eating champignons, king oysters, etc. (chanterelles are my fav) ;)
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
CR Pro
Apr 30, 2017
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sounds yummy! :sick:
So I will continue to consume your wonderful pictures (#3 is my fav), (y)
and keep eating champignons, king oysters, etc. (chanterelles are my fav) ;)
Let's start with the facts: back in Europe I was doing a list of the species I ate (and survive:) !). Some, like members of Entoloma I ate after ~year of research (incl. microscopy) and they were really good! My list got in between 200-250 species, I don't remember the exact number. The logic behind of this? If you are not sure in your knowledge in the taxonomy of Fungi why you have to pretend to be an expert in that field? It was something like "I pay with my head for my conclusions". And it payed off!

Well, now - I afraid you have not much of idea: "champignons" are ~250-300 species in Europe alone. Some are excellent others not that much... What you buy in the store is mostly Agaricus bisporus. There are others with rather different taste and you can collect them only in the wild. For some purposes I would check the bisporus ( and few others from the same group from the wild) but my favorites are species that you have no chance to buy in the store!
Cantharelles: I have collected few species of them - some in really huge amount... Rarely liked the final result after cooking (may be in omelettes?).
My personal favorites are the Boletus edulis (especially the dried once!), Amanita ceasarea and just imagine: The King Oysters - but wild! You have no chance to recognize them if in the field! The wilds are mostly cap and small stem! And off course - Morchelas (most of the species!)! There are many others but it's a long story, I hope I mentioned the most important once (questionable - depends on the taste!).
 
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Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
CR Pro
Nov 7, 2013
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Germany
... Well, now - I afraid you have not much of idea: "champignons" are ~250-300 species in Europe alone. Some are excellent others not that much... What you buy in the store is mostly Agaricus bisporus. There are others with rather different taste and you can collect them only in the wild. ...
Thanks for sharing your insight. I just wanted to make a joke.
I have some knowledge and ideas of what I get in stores.
But I am not good enough to go mushrooming.