Patent: Canon RF 180mm f/3.5L Macro and Canon RF 200mm f/4L Macro

Dalantech

Gatekeeper to the Small World
Feb 12, 2015
111
89

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
26,049
4,613
I've asked if anyone can point to any production lens specific design actually being first mentioned as an example in a patent application and no-one's pointed out a single case to me. I also haven't seen such a case myself. I'm sure it must happen from time to time but I'm still waiting for someone to point such a case out. Until we have a good record of many or even most new lenses being mentioned in patents as examples of their respected general architecture or designs, though, I think it'd be premature to hope that this particular design would be built.

How many examples would you like? I didn't bother going back too far.




And here's a fresh new example to add to the list.


 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
440
477
UK
My kit is mostly primes so 180mm is a very compelling focal length for a 1:1 or greater macro lens, imho.
The 65mm macro is a fine lens for head shots at 1:1 or higher magnifications, but for butterflies, dragonflies, grasshoppers and most other insects that are encountered in the field, a longer focal length is usually preferable.

Most of the participants on my wildlife photography tours use a 90mm or 100mm macro, and find that it offers a good working distance with nervous insects. A few use the Sigma 150mm macro or the 180mm Canon macro.

I’ve used a Canon 100mm F2.8L IS macro for years, and find it offers the best compromise, with a good working distance, light weight, and the important ability to be able to also shoot more distant subjects without having to swap lenses.

I’ve also got the Canon 180mm macro which has superior bokeh, but is more difficult to keep steady, despite the IBIS in my R5. I’ve also got a Sigma 150mm macro, but it’s heavy and slow focusing, so it’s purely there as a backup.

Back in the days of film, when we were generally limited to ISO 100 slide films, most people used flash to enable a usable combination of small aperture and freezing movement, but from my observations, the vast majority of people nowadays prefer to shoot by ambient lighting, unless they are working indoors or in the darkness of a rainforest interior.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
26,049
4,613
Back in the days of film, when we were generally limited to ISO 100 slide films, most people used flash to enable a usable combination of small aperture and freezing movement, but from my observations, the vast majority of people nowadays prefer to shoot by ambient lighting, unless they are working indoors or in the darkness of a rainforest interior.
…or shooting at high magnification. For example, shooting with the MP-E 65 at a diffraction-friendly f/11, the effective aperture at 5x is f/66. That’s why I use the twin-flash.
 
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SwissFrank

from EOS 1N to R
Dec 9, 2018
652
369
I've used a TS 90mm, closeup lens, and I THINK a 2xTC, can't remember now, for shooting butterflies. It helped to be able to tilt the plane of focus for butterflies.