The Canon EOS R3 will be 24mp, confirmed by EXIF data

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
1,743
1,307
Lenses most likely to actually work at 30fps? I’d be interested to see which lenses are actually able to keep up when bolted on the front of this new mini-monster.
No lens can handle 30 fps at f/22. Probably every lens can handle it wide open. How far you can stop down without impacting frame rate will depend on the specific lens.
 
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miketcool

EOS 90D
Jun 29, 2017
190
381
How many times does this have to be disproven on these very forums? Pixel density does not negatively impact total image noise within a format.
Show me what you're referring to.

This is false, my R5 performs far better in low light than my a9ii and it has double the resolution.
Add machine learning AF to either one of those and get back to me. I'm sure there are a number of engineering issues to resolve from noise to power consumption. The bottom line is for the professionals this body is designed for, 24mp is enough.

You talk of supply chain issues and such, implying it is some sort of excuse? And yet the a1 was released with all of these "supply chain" issues...
The R5 and several RF lenses saw long production delays. The A1 also saw a limited release and manufacturing delays. It's not an excuse, but a reality. We don't know what is around the corner that could hamper the R3's release further.
 

unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
6,418
4,063
68
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
When you're a professional photo journalist, action, or sports photographer; switching to a rival camera system is the option. The gear is paid for on your first or second assignment. The semi-pro and enthusiast crowd own pro bodies as a luxury item.
What photojournalists, action and sports photographers do you know? News photographers have been grossly underpaid for 50 years or more. Newspapers are cash strapped and often require the photographers to buy their own equipment. Those that do supply equipment aren't switching systems or even buying new bodies and lenses until the old ones die.

If I see another photographer at a college sport event they are as likely to be using a Rebel as any other body and are frequently either sports information officers or student photographers. The few actual pro photographers I meet are usually like me -- working for the school either on contract or part time and paying for their own equipment. The only reason I can afford good equipment is because I am retired from a long career and my retirement income covers my GAS and allows me to subsidize my part time work at the college.

The photojournalists covering major news stories are often freelancers or contract photographers also responsible for their own equipment. If they are covering a war or civil unrest, they are often locals who use whatever equipment they can get their hands on and, unfortunately, are treated as expendable by the services they work with.

People have this ridiculous idea that photographers covering DC politics or professional sporting events are typical. They are not. They are a tiny minority. And even among that group, many are just plugging away struggling to stay in the middle class.
 

H. Jones

Photojournalist
Aug 1, 2014
746
1,463
What photojournalists, action and sports photographers do you know? News photographers have been grossly underpaid for 50 years or more. Newspapers are cash strapped and often require the photographers to buy their own equipment. Those that do supply equipment aren't switching systems or even buying new bodies and lenses until the old ones die.

If I see another photographer at a college sport event they are as likely to be using a Rebel as any other body and are frequently either sports information officers or student photographers. The few actual pro photographers I meet are usually like me -- working for the school either on contract or part time and paying for their own equipment. The only reason I can afford good equipment is because I am retired from a long career and my retirement income covers my GAS and allows me to subsidize my part time work at the college.

The photojournalists covering major news stories are often freelancers or contract photographers also responsible for their own equipment. If they are covering a war or civil unrest, they are often locals who use whatever equipment they can get their hands on and, unfortunately, are treated as expendable by the services they work with.

People have this ridiculous idea that photographers covering DC politics or professional sporting events are typical. They are not. They are a tiny minority. And even among that group, many are just plugging away struggling to stay in the middle class.

100% accurate. I think most people on this forum would be surprised to know that the majority of professional photojournalists I run into today, whether that's print or sports photographers, are all still using their Canon 1DX, 5D3s, 7D, or Nikon D4s/D700s. Many have been totally laid off and replaced by reporters with their iPhones snapping photos.

A lot of these organizations are so strapped for cash that just replacing a broken 200-400 F/4 would most likely require them to lay off one of the 3 people still left working for the paper.

The only reason I have the equipment I have is because I made the tough decision to leave working full time in news for a higher-paying staff commercial photography/videography job. That, in a similar vein to your retirement, is what subsidizes my personal equipment for the work I do with the newspapers.
 

Twinix

C100 III + R6?
May 6, 2020
106
79
Norway
Im curious about the hotshoe. Will it actually feature something better, or is it just talk. I still really want an XLR adapter!
 

miketcool

EOS 90D
Jun 29, 2017
190
381
What photojournalists, action and sports photographers do you know? News photographers have been grossly underpaid for 50 years or more. Newspapers are cash strapped and often require the photographers to buy their own equipment.

Staff photographers working for a newspaper are very different than independent photojournalists. More than 2/3rds of media staff photogs have to buy their own gear with meager salaries, which is why they rely on longevity. I know enough professional photographers in the three categories that I mentioned to know that they can upgrade gear after 1-2 jobs.

International press photos on war coverage are highly editorialized, so no, they aren't mostly from random locals with low cost gear. Most of the images that come from conflict for news stories are on-assignment photojournalists working with international organizations like AP, Reuters, or the UN.
 
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Aug 7, 2018
356
306
After my second "flagship" camera was broken at still quite a small shutter count, I lost my trust in the durability of those flagship cameras. My 1D Mark II had a broken shutter after less than 9000 photos. Fortunately it was still under warranty and I did not have to pay for the repair. However the 1D X broke after about 60,000 photos. The PCB had to be replaced and I had to pay more than 600 Euros for the repair. That may not be a lot compared to the price of the camera, but I did not expect that the PCB will brake before that shutter will brake. It is just electronics. I hardly ever used burst mode, as I did not want to waste too many of the expected 400,000 shutter releases. Having a broken camera after 60,000 shots was quite shocking for me. I googled the problem and found out that many people had to replace the PCB of the 1D X after a while. That is not something you should expect from such an expensive camera. Will those problems get even worse with mirrorless cameras, which contain even more electronics and even need electronics just to compose the photo?

As an enthusiast I want to collect my cameras for eternity. They still should work in decades from now, as today decades old cameras still work. Is that no longer the case for modern cameras? Can we expect an R3 to break after five or ten years? That would very much discourage me from paying thousands of Euros for a camera again.
 

tapanit

.
CR Pro
Jul 17, 2012
119
62
Because you can't remap the Rate button on the R5
Well, you can, but in a very limited way, and only for playback uses (rating, memo recording/playback, protect, erase). And remapping is done in a completely different place than other buttons ("play4", i.e., submenu 4 under playback).

It would be nice if it could be repurposed during shooting, too.
 

Diltiazem

Curiosity didn't kill me, yet.
Aug 23, 2014
199
73
Canon cameras have lower resolution JPEG modes. For example, 5DsR's highest quality JPEG is 8688x5792 (50MP) and the lowest quality (M2) is 5760x3840 (22MP).
So, it is entirely possible that the photographer was shooting with a 24 MP mode, but the camera's actual maximum resolution is higher.
Possible, but unlikely.
 

David - Sydney

EOS R
CR Pro
Dec 7, 2014
996
832
www.flickr.com
Well, you can, but in a very limited way, and only for playback uses (rating, memo recording/playback, protect, erase). And remapping is done in a completely different place than other buttons ("play4", i.e., submenu 4 under playback).

It would be nice if it could be repurposed during shooting, too.
yes, I want it to switch between EVF and rear LCD and needed to use MF-n which is an ergonomic pain in an underwater housing. The Rate button would have been perfectly positioned
 

Stig Nygaard

EOS 7D II, Powershot G5 X II & Olympus TG-5
CR Pro
Jul 10, 2013
132
234
Copenhagen
www.flickr.com
Although I think 24mp is realistic and don't see anything wrong with it, I am not convinced of this "proof" ...
When I resize my photos in Photoshop those Exif-data are updated to the new image-dimension. Of course in this case the exif-data shows different dimensions than the image, so it is a very realistic assumption that the "exif-dimensions" originate from the camera. However, then it is interesting to read an older Jeff Cable's blog-post where he makes a wishlist for Canons future professional camera:

* User selectable image resolution

Many of the newer DSLR and mirrorless cameras are offering really high resolutions, in the 40MP to 70MP range. For most of my photography, I don't need or even want that type of resolution. But I would love to have the choice to shoot at various resolutions, depending on what I am capturing. I would love to have a camera that would let me shoot anywhere from 20MP to 50MP, and make it use selectable.

So if the camera indeed has such a function, maybe JC wouldn't choose highest resolution?
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,944
852
After my second "flagship" camera was broken at still quite a small shutter count, I lost my trust in the durability of those flagship cameras. My 1D Mark II had a broken shutter after less than 9000 photos. Fortunately it was still under warranty and I did not have to pay for the repair. However the 1D X broke after about 60,000 photos. The PCB had to be replaced and I had to pay more than 600 Euros for the repair. That may not be a lot compared to the price of the camera, but I did not expect that the PCB will brake before that shutter will brake. It is just electronics. I hardly ever used burst mode, as I did not want to waste too many of the expected 400,000 shutter releases. Having a broken camera after 60,000 shots was quite shocking for me. I googled the problem and found out that many people had to replace the PCB of the 1D X after a while. That is not something you should expect from such an expensive camera. Will those problems get even worse with mirrorless cameras, which contain even more electronics and even need electronics just to compose the photo?

As an enthusiast I want to collect my cameras for eternity. They still should work in decades from now, as today decades old cameras still work. Is that no longer the case for modern cameras? Can we expect an R3 to break after five or ten years? That would very much discourage me from paying thousands of Euros for a camera again.
Sorry to hear about your experience, but this is an exception - not the rule.
 

Fbimages

EOS R5 1DX mark iii GFX 100
Mar 4, 2020
27
94
www.instagram.com
I mainly shoot wildlife, so I was hoping for at least 30MP. 24MP and $6k US price tag means this is not a camera for me.
The 1DX III is even lower MP than this and you can still blow up prints to a very nice size. This is a photo of a SEO I took with it and you wouldn’t guess it’s 20 mega pixels
 

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AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
8,880
12,168
AF machine learning works best with as little noise as possible. When you use higher resolution sensors, you increase sensor noise. Your statement is correct up until you are shooting in lower light, or with longer lenses at higher aperture. Sports, photo journalism, and action are three areas that lighting isn't ideal which is why you see 20.1 mp in the 1DX mkii and you'll likely see under 30mp on the R3. It is considerably more work for machine learning or AI AF when there is noise to also sort through when nanoseconds matter.
If the computing power is adequate, then at higher levels of light, the more the pixels on target, the better the AI and focusssing and so the better the high denbsity sensor. At lower levels of light where photon noise becomes limiting, then the AI for the high density sensor will tend to that of the lower density one because the same amount of light falls on the image from both. So, for good computing power, the high density sensor's focussing varies from as good as to better. If the computing power is inadequate, then you are limited by that.
 
Aug 7, 2018
356
306
I have many 60x40cm photos on my wall and some of them were taken with my 1D Mark II, which has 8.2 megapixels. They are sharp enough for that size. Only if you look very close you will see the difference with the newer 18 megapixel photos. Anything above those 18 megapixels would be overkill unless I crop.
 

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
8,880
12,168
The 1DX III is even lower MP than this and you can still blow up prints to a very nice size. This is a photo of a SEO I took with it and you wouldn’t guess it’s 20 mega pixels
20 Mpx are more than good enough for bird photography if you don't have to crop. The problem facing me is that just about always I have to crop and am very happy if the bird occupies an area of 4 Mpx on the sensor. We all have different requirements and I am pleased that the R3 suits those who find 24 Mpx enough as they deserve a camera that fits their requirements.
 

sanj

EOS R5
Jan 22, 2012
3,944
852
Not crazy. But no one here has access to Canon's market research. Whether we understand it or not, you can be sure they base their decisions on solid research and know what the market is that they are targeting. Cameras are like every other product, you have to pick the one that checks off most of the boxes for you. Seldom will something check off all the boxes. Process your disappointment, wait for the actual announcement and then decide what you want.
The camera is not high res because of its processing power. The camera's focus is 'speed' in every aspect. So they chose lower MP to have faster response, FPS, processing etc. As technology progresses, processing power will increase and so will the MP in such cameras. (My thinking.)
 
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