Tilta shows off a cooling module for the Canon EOS R5

David - Sydney

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Dec 7, 2014
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I think that Canon missed an opportunity to increase the sales of the grip with the 5Ghz transmitter/ ethernet by not having a heat pipe into it. Even extending the video recording times by 10 minutes may have pushed sales of the more expensive grip a lot.
 
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CaMeRa QuEsT

EOS M5 11-22/4-5.6 22/2 50/1.8 STM+EF-EOSM 270EXII
Sep 12, 2016
43
42

If that's true, then the overheating problem lies in the sensor not having a physical conduit, for example a heat pipe, to route heat out of it to a separate, larger heat sink due to it having to float freely inside the IBIS unit, thus there is no possible workaround to cool it down in a fast manner other than blowing cool air directly onto the sensor's surface, which will explain the fan-cooled EF-to-RF adapter Canon patent that is floating around. In the Northrups' second video, Chelsea explains that after an hour of still shooting, the battery was mostly depleted and also couldn't make a video longer than just a couple minutes before an overheating warning would stop her from further shooting. Things do really not good now, but then I've never really been very interested in either one of these bodies.
 

tss68nl

EOS M50
Sep 2, 2014
26
3
The problem here is the plastic on the outside of the camera. Plastic for the most part is an insulator, so a Peltier cooler is not going to draw heat through the plastic.

Well, it all comes down to thickness. If plastic would insulate heat that well, all refrigerators would just have a thin plastic wall.

The plastic underneath the screen is probably going to be paper thin and sandwiched to the magnesium alloy frame backing plate and is basically one connected piece with the rest of the body. With a peltier element, you will be able to cool the entire magnesium alloy body, as once you penetrate the plastic, magnesium alloys are quite good thermal conductors (less than aluminium, but way more than steel).

The plastic will have some resistance, but the surface area is large enough to still get quite some heat through.

If there is plastic....it would be quite easy for Canon to make that part of the housing out of aluminium. Or maybe they alloyed the plastic with metals to make it more heat-conductive. Or maybe if they didn't think of that before, they'll now steal my idea and R5/R6 delivery will be delayed by a month :)

Anyway.
The external cooling element will allow you to cool the entire frame way below room temperature in advance, no matter what insulation the plastic poses. And to what extent the thermal capacity will hold up to what the R5 produces: we'll see. If they come anywhere close to 50-80% of the heating capacity it'll make a huge difference in how long you can run the camera for. It'd mean a 5-25 times increase of running times.
 

raptor3x

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Jan 26, 2012
618
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Honestly that sounds like they either put the ice in a bad place or there's some kind of overly conservative software limitation rather than something actually based on the electronics temperature. Would be really interesting if we could get some kind of thermal imaging of the camera to see how it's behaving when overheating.
 

tss68nl

EOS M50
Sep 2, 2014
26
3
Honestly that sounds like they either put the ice in a bad place or there's some kind of overly conservative software limitation rather than something actually based on the electronics temperature. Would be really interesting if we could get some kind of thermal imaging of the camera to see how it's behaving when overheating.

Well, I'd be surprised if they managed to have a contact-patch larger than a dime with the ice surface for a prolonged period. Added fact that ice will never go below 0 degrees celcius in that particular situation, where the surface of a peltier could. The 100 MPH air remarks make it even more likely they didn't know what they where doing.

Blowing air is effective when you can actually replace the hot air inside the body....but they are replacing the air outside the body, and that air is not hot anyway. So they are not creating a better thermal conductivity or just by an insignificant amount. They'd be better off keeping the body moist, then blowing air over it to evaporate. Essentially making the body sweat. But that'll just help out a couple degrees.
 

Ramage

EOS R5
CR Pro
Aug 27, 2019
589
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Honestly that sounds like they either put the ice in a bad place or there's some kind of overly conservative software limitation rather than something actually based on the electronics temperature. Would be really interesting if we could get some kind of thermal imaging of the camera to see how it's behaving when overheating.
That is a cool idea I have thermal cameras at work, when I get my unit I will give this a try.

Another thing that keeps bouncing around in my head is someone tested a bunch of cfexpress cards and reported how hot they got. I really want to know how much of a factor that is by testing if I can extend record times by swapping the cards in before I see a thermal warning on screen.
 

Ben Sparrow

I'm New Here
Jul 10, 2020
12
3
The problem is Canon releasing a camera incapable of not overheating when shooting 8K RAW. A workaround is not a fix. A real fix will be a future release of the R5 line when they have enough technology to shoot 8K RAW without overheating. Until then...
 

weixing

EOS RP
Jul 20, 2010
619
19
Astrophotographer had been modding camera to active cool the camera sensor, so I don't think it'll be difficult to do, but will void the warranty.
 

Ramage

EOS R5
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Aug 27, 2019
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The problem is Canon releasing a camera incapable of not overheating when shooting 8K RAW. A workaround is not a fix. A real fix will be a future release of the R5 line when they have enough technology to shoot 8K RAW without overheating. Until then...
Not sure a fan and a bigger body is a big leap for Canon.
 

privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jan 29, 2011
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The problem is Canon releasing a camera incapable of not overheating when shooting 8K RAW. A workaround is not a fix. A real fix will be a future release of the R5 line when they have enough technology to shoot 8K RAW without overheating. Until then...
Buy a $5,995 Z Cam, a $9,995 Blackmagic URSA Mini Pro, a $24,500 body only RED Helium S35...
 

SGo

6D
Jul 26, 2020
1
0
This might work. This is a peltier cooler. The heat sink and fan is not to keep the back of the camera cooler but to keep one side of the peltier cooler. If you put a voltage across a peltier device, one side get very cold and the other side get very hot. If you reverse the voltage the cold side not gets hot and the hot side get cold.
As the device get too hot, it start to loose it effceincy.
 

tiggy@mac.com

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Jan 20, 2014
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Another thing that keeps bouncing around in my head is someone tested a bunch of cfexpress cards and reported how hot they got. I really want to know how much of a factor that is by testing if I can extend record times by swapping the cards in before I see a thermal warning on screen.

That dude was me. I doubt that swapping cards would have an enormous effect, but perhaps using an external recorder would cause the heat to happen outside of the camera. Just swapping cards wouldn’t hurt, and they *were* quite hot. For background, the heat was generated while doing read/write torture tests in a card reader, not in an R5.
 
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raptor3x

EOS RP
Jan 26, 2012
618
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State College, PA
whumber.com
What is 'active' cooling please?

Active cooling generally means cooling facilitated with an external power source as opposed to passive cooling which does not require an external power source. With air cooling that usually means there's is some type of fan to provide forced convection where a passively cooled system with operate purely on some a combination of natural convection and conduction. You can also have forced convection but with other fluids like water, phase change system, thermoelectric systems, chemical reaction based systems, and if you want to get super fancy and achieve extremely low temperatures magnetic refrigeration systems.
 
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BeenThere

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Sep 4, 2012
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So many wonderful ideas here to fix problems. I think you guys should start your own camera manufacturing company. Think of the internet fame coming your way. :sleep:
 

Baron_Karza

EOS RP
Feb 17, 2019
343
412

So basically nothing gets in and nothing gets out.

This is what I get from all the videos and articles I've encountered so far. EXCEPT for ONE: And that is from CANON themselves. They say to use an external fan. WTF??

Come one guys, enough is enough! I love Canon but we can't be apologizing about the heat issues. Canon's become a joke now.
 

canonnews

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Dec 27, 2017
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He's right in way, but the camera at the time they started cooling it was already hot, so he's also very wrong as well.

the concept of this is to reduce the temperature delta over time in a sealed space by making the magnesium alloy colder.

I wrote up about this just now. these chips (and sensors) are not getting super hot like CPU's in your laptop or computer, but any increase of temperature over ambient over time in a sealed camera will increase until the point of where it's a problem if it rises too quickly.

what this is attempting to do is reduce that "delta-T" to where it's less of a problem by adding some active lower temperature surface inside versus the hotter running chips, sensor,etc.

It's entirely possible that this will work, but it won't still cool off an already hot camera.

He also doesn't understand what a peltier device is either. Those things can get bloody cold - alot colder than ice.
 
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