Here is the Canon EOS R5 and Canon EOS R6, along with the announcement date

Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
High speed uses a shooting priority over refocusing. Use the regular continuous shooting mode. That uses a tracking priority placing a higher priority on retaining focus than a higher number of FPS. Probably 5 or less FPS, but it’ll track better.

High speed is good for a fast moving subject across the same plane of focus.
Hi, thanks. Im going to ask a really dumb question about this. When you say 'regular shooting mode' what exactly do you mean? Are you referring to the frame rate as there are basically single shot, high speed continuous and low speed continuous? I'm getting so confused lol, I wasn't aware that apart from face and eye detection / tracking, there was a tracking option. Is this a different setting and if so where is it in the menu. I'm reading the manual as we speak as I'm pretty sure it's not just me that's the issue but also the settings I have used. This is what happens when you only do one aspect of shooting and then try something new lol.

I appreciate the help.
Cheers
 

FamilyGuy

EOS 80D
Feb 5, 2020
103
137
Hi, thanks. Im going to ask a really dumb question about this. When you say 'regular shooting mode' what exactly do you mean? Are you referring to the frame rate as there are basically single shot, high speed continuous and low speed continuous? I'm getting so confused lol, I wasn't aware that apart from face and eye detection / tracking, there was a tracking option. Is this a different setting and if so where is it in the menu. I'm reading the manual as we speak as I'm pretty sure it's not just me that's the issue but also the settings I have used. This is what happens when you only do one aspect of shooting and then try something new lol.

I appreciate the help.
Cheers
See my expanded answer above.
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,468
1,137
The R doesn’t do well with fast and/or erratic subjects like a dog. It’s pretty horrible imo.
 

FamilyGuy

EOS 80D
Feb 5, 2020
103
137
The R doesn’t do well with fast and/or erratic subjects like a dog. It’s pretty horrible imo.
I find some success on the RP using zone AF (tracking within a targeted zone) with regular continuous shooting for my sons soccer games. It’s no pro-rig for sure. You definitely have to be mindful of settings and don’t expect a 100% hit rate. But you shouldn’t be missing all of them.
 
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Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
High speed uses a shooting priority over refocusing. Use the regular continuous shooting mode. That uses a tracking priority placing a higher priority on retaining focus than a higher number of FPS. Probably 5 or less FPS, but it’ll track better.

High speed is good for a fast moving subject across the same plane of focus.

Without an image, to expand a bit on shooting modes. On the menu, the single square is for single shot. The three overlapping squares is for continuous shooting (tracking priority). The three overlapping squares with the ‘H’ is for high speed continuous (speed priority).

The second one is what you want.
That makes much more sense. I think Canon call the 2nd one low speed continuous.

As I write, I had just been reading about the continuous AF setting and servo setting. They seem to be the same thing where the camera focuses continuously when the shutter button is pressed half way. Am I right? I currently have the AF On button programmed to flip between single shot and Servo as it's easier than going into the menus.

Thanks again.
 
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Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
I find some success on the RP using zone AF (tracking within a targeted zone) with regular continuous shooting for my sons soccer games. It’s no pro-rig for sure. You definitely have to be mindful of settings and don’t expect a 100% hit rate. But you shouldn’t be missing all of them.
Cheers, as I said, I May need more practice panning and following the subject but your suggestion of using the low speed continuous setting that has a lower frame rate but tracking priority will certainly help.

What settings are you using for tracking sensitivity and acceleration / deceleration tracking? I have just changed them to -1 and +2 so it is not quite locked on but will be responsive.

I think if this was my full time job, I would need the 1dx mk111 lol.

Cheers
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,468
1,137
Cheers, as I said, I May need more practice panning and following the subject but your suggestion of using the low speed continuous setting that has a lower frame rate but tracking priority will certainly help.

What settings are you using for tracking sensitivity and acceleration / deceleration tracking? I have just changed them to -1 and +2 so it is not quite locked on but will be responsive.

I think if this was my full time job, I would need the 1dx mk111 lol.

Cheers
Try -1 and +1 I find that to work the best for the most variety of subjects and scenarios. I use single point and sometimes with 4- point expansion. But even with that and every other trick in the book I find severely lacking. I don’t even expect it to be kind of close
To the 1dx2, but it should be better than it is...
 

FamilyGuy

EOS 80D
Feb 5, 2020
103
137
That makes much more sense. I think Canon call the 2nd one low speed continuous.

As I write, I had just been reading about the continuous AF setting and servo setting. They seem to be the same thing where the camera focuses continuously when the shutter button is pressed half way. Am I right? I currently have the AF On button programmed to flip between single shot and Servo as it's easier than going into the menus.

Thanks again.
With continuous, it’s always trying to find focus if the camera is on whether you’re pressing the shutter button or not. Unless you’re recording a movie, you shouldn’t use this. It’s a battery drain.

Servo continuously refocuses to your subject as long as you're holding the focus button ( half shutter in your case). That’s what you want.

I set mine up for back button focus by mapping the focus button to the AF-On button taking focus from the shutter. I leave it in Servo and hold the button with my thumb. That way, if I want to lock focus, I just take my thumb off the button. It stops refocusing and I can continue to shoot. Then I never have to take it out of Servo because it acts like single shot.

Look up back button focus on YouTube for more “how to”. It’s not something everyone likes. I found it rather intuitive, but there’s no “right” way.
 

Whowe

Looking for 7D Mark ii upgrade??
Mar 4, 2020
82
80
Cheers, as I said, I May need more practice panning and following the subject but your suggestion of using the low speed continuous setting that has a lower frame rate but tracking priority will certainly help.

What settings are you using for tracking sensitivity and acceleration / deceleration tracking? I have just changed them to -1 and +2 so it is not quite locked on but will be responsive.

I think if this was my full time job, I would need the 1dx mk111 lol.

Cheers
You mentioned that you may need "practice panning and following the subject." If you have your shutter speed high enough, panning becomes a little less important. High shutter speed is critical for consistently getting sharp images of fast moving objects (i.e. wildlife). Yes, some people will get some sharp images of fast moving objects (cars, bikes) using slower shutter and panning, but those are steady and fast, not erratically moving subjects. Usually, for starting out, you want to make sure your shutter is high enough.
 

Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
Try -1 and +1 I find that to work the best for the most variety of subjects and scenarios. I use single point and sometimes with 4- point expansion. But even with that and every other trick in the book I find severely lacking. I don’t even expect it to be kind of close
To the 1dx2, but it should be better than it is...
Thanks, those will be my next set of tests. it's good fun this photo malarky lol :ROFLMAO:
 
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BillB

EOS 6D MK II
May 11, 2017
1,387
657
General question to anyone on the forum who has an EOS R and uses it for sports, wildlife / fast moving objects.

I mainly do landscapes and have no issues with the R's performance in this area. However during the lockdown, I've started taking pictures of the family dog and wildlife and have really struggled with getting shots that are in focus. I'm not sure if it's me being a little inexperienced with this type of shooting or using the wrong settings. Ive tried high speed continuous shutter speed with servo AF and still not great.

I know the R was never designed for fast frame rate shooting so this may be the thing that pushes me to buy the R5 if the EVF lag and AF has been sorted.

Any suggestions or help would be appreciated.
Can you get sharp images shooting single shot in light that is good enough to have a fast shutter and good depth of field?
 

Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
You mentioned that you may need "practice panning and following the subject." If you have your shutter speed high enough, panning becomes a little less important. High shutter speed is critical for consistently getting sharp images of fast moving objects (i.e. wildlife). Yes, some people will get some sharp images of fast moving objects (cars, bikes) using slower shutter and panning, but those are steady and fast, not erratically moving subjects. Usually, for starting out, you want to make sure your shutter is high enough.
Thanks, I was using 1/1600 of a second and 1/2000 so should have been OK but I think I had the wrong settings for FPS. Cheers
 

Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
Can you get sharp images shooting single shot in light that is good enough to have a fast shutter and good depth of field?
Yup, I have no issues with single shot, all pin sharp when I am able to be quick enough to find the subject lol. it's just when I want to follow a moving subject and need to use the higher FPS I have issues. As I said, I thinks its a combination of me and having the wrong settings. Plus the R doesn't have the fastest frame rate, especially when in Servo mode!

Thanks
 
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Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
With continuous, it’s always trying to find focus if the camera is on whether you’re pressing the shutter button or not. Unless you’re recording a movie, you shouldn’t use this. It’s a battery drain.

Servo continuously refocuses to your subject as long as you're holding the focus button ( half shutter in your case). That’s what you want.

I set mine up for back button focus by mapping the focus button to the AF-On button taking focus from the shutter. I leave it in Servo and hold the button with my thumb. That way, if I want to lock focus, I just take my thumb off the button. It stops refocusing and I can continue to shoot. Then I never have to take it out of Servo because it acts like single shot.

Look up back button focus on YouTube for more “how to”. It’s not something everyone likes. I found it rather intuitive, but there’s no “right” way.
That makes sense re the difference between servo and continuous. I was using servo so will continue with that. I think the next test will be using the low speed continuous FPS option.

I really appreciate everyone's comments and thoughts on this, all really useful. :D

Just playing around like this although frustrating has made me want to get out more and just take photos, something I'd lost the motivation for. It's great and even better as we can hopefully get out and about more.

I'd sort of resigned myself to keeping the R as the R5 looks a little outside of my budget but doing these few days trying something different has given me the bug again so if VAT (sale tax ) is reduced as rumoured, I may just have to push the boat out and go for it lol
 

FamilyGuy

EOS 80D
Feb 5, 2020
103
137
That makes sense re the difference between servo and continuous. I was using servo so will continue with that. I think the next test will be using the low speed continuous FPS option.

I really appreciate everyone's comments and thoughts on this, all really useful. :D

Just playing around like this although frustrating has made me want to get out more and just take photos, something I'd lost the motivation for. It's great and even better as we can hopefully get out and about more.

I'd sort of resigned myself to keeping the R as the R5 looks a little outside of my budget but doing these few days trying something different has given me the bug again so if VAT (sale tax ) is reduced as rumoured, I may just have to push the boat out and go for it lol
Speaking only for myself, I’ll keep my RP. I’ve got a long way to go before my skill set taxes the capabilities of this camera!
 

Starting out EOS R

EOS R - RF24-105mm F4L, RF70-200mm f2.8L
Feb 13, 2020
176
152
Speaking only for myself, I’ll keep my RP. I’ve got a long way to go before my skill set taxes the capabilities of this camera!
I like your practical and disciplined approach. I wish I wasn't so easily influenced by new shiny things lol
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
2,511
1,438
the new 600/800mm big silver lens may make it under the event limits. seriously high ISO though to freeze action @f11.

I doubt even collapsed they will be less than 6" in length. Some venues restrict lenses to 4" or less. Some of them also make you extend the lens to its longest length.
 

The Fat Fish

VFX Artist
Jul 29, 2017
102
60
27
Exeter, UK
Just curious. What is your shooting style? You sound like a video shooter touting good 4K, but then say 20MP is not enough. It's enough for 4K, which is why I think it was the chosen sensor size. Guess it means you shoot photos if you need the increased resolution. Would you consider having an R for stills which has 30.3MP and the R6 for video? Budget, or the need to carry only 1 body are valid reasons.

Many can make do with 20MP for photos, but I understand if the workflow involves large format printing or heavy cropping why it wouldn't be enough.
My style makes it tricky. I mostly do landscapes so resolution and dynamic range are important. What makes it tricky is I also do events and often need to swap between stills and video quickly. The EOS R isn't great if I am honest, I hired one for a few weeks and was very dissapointed. The 30mp was good and the dynamic range was fair but it lacked IBIS, had poor video features and there was the risk of only having one card slot. Also the touch bar was a mistake.
 
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