Here are more Canon EOS R6 Specifications [CR2]

Sep 1, 2018
8
3
Eye detect also? One would think so. Big question aside from price for R6 is DR. ??? :geek:
this was the thing I noticed as well, not sure why it wouldn't since their other mirrorless cameras have it. would be dumb to have a more expensive camera lacking something the EOS R has? I was willing to maybe look past the 20Mpix sensor but not EYE AF. will have to save a while for the R5
 

PhotonShark

I'm New Here
Jun 10, 2020
11
11
What I do when I’m somewhere I will want pinpoint later is just take a shot with my iPhone. Then later I can just check the metadata from that shot. It happens rarely enough that it is not a bother. I think of times on the Antrim coast of Ireland and on beaches in Hawaii (other than Waikiki). The time stamp helps me coordinate pictures from both camera and phone if there is some doubt.
How funny, I do the same. But, it’s still annoying and time consuming to do something that could be automated.

A Bluetooth connection to a stand alone GPS would solve the problem. They’re cheap (as low as as $50), have all day battery life and can live in the top of your camera bag.

No reason why a firmware update couldn’t enable this functionality.
 

canonmike

EOS 90D
Jan 5, 2013
155
86
I'm hoping that the R6 will include in camera auto focus stacking capabilities, like its younger RP sibling does. This feature, if included, along with DPP 4 will allow for further focus stacking experimentation with the new line of RF lenses without having to purchase light room or photoshop. I'm particularly looking fwd to trying it in closeup macro and landscape work. Depending on the final specs, the R6 may be just what I'm looking for in my next Canon mirrorless camera. We're getting closer.
 

smeyer02

EOS 70D
Jul 2, 2020
2
0
Upstate NY
I'm hoping someone can confirm or correct my thinking about the R6 sensor. I've been shooting with EF lenses on my 70D, taking advantage of the crop factor as de facto magnification. Going to a FF sensor with the same lens (say the EF 100 f/2.8L) will result in the same hypothetical subject appearing smaller within the frame, right?

I think this means that the 20MP FF sensor on the R6 will give me a significantly smaller pixel density when I crop an image to match the FOV of the 20.2 MP APS-C sensor I've got.

Seeing that I like to use my camera mostly for macro work and air shows (both of which frequently means cropping the images to help the subject fill the screen), I'm thinking a FF camera with more pixels might be a better choice than the R6 (which is very attractive because of its other features).

Thoughts?
 

Aussie shooter

www.facebook.com/BrettGuyPhotography/
Dec 6, 2016
812
987
I'm hoping someone can confirm or correct my thinking about the R6 sensor. I've been shooting with EF lenses on my 70D, taking advantage of the crop factor as de facto magnification. Going to a FF sensor with the same lens (say the EF 100 f/2.8L) will result in the same hypothetical subject appearing smaller within the frame, right?

I think this means that the 20MP FF sensor on the R6 will give me a significantly smaller pixel density when I crop an image to match the FOV of the 20.2 MP APS-C sensor I've got.

Seeing that I like to use my camera mostly for macro work and air shows (both of which frequently means cropping the images to help the subject fill the screen), I'm thinking a FF camera with more pixels might be a better choice than the R6 (which is very attractive because of its other features).

Thoughts?
Yes....and no. Yes. When cropping you will be sacrificing pixels on target but due to the lower noise intitially it may not be as much of a hit in IQ as you think. Less resolution but also less noise in the final image
 
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Joules

EOS R
Jul 16, 2017
916
1,009
Hamburg, Germany
Yes....and no. Yes. When cropping you will be sacrificing pixels on target but due to the lower noise intitially it may not be as much of a hit in IQ as you think. Less resolution but also less noise in the final image
After cropping a FF image to match the FoV taken from the same spot, they will actually have the same amount of noise in them. Unless the sensors are very different, which should be the case comparing the 70D to any newer Canon of course.

But the point remains. After all, both images would have come from an identical sized sensor area and therefore have the same amount of light. Why would one be less noisy than the other?
 
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Aussie shooter

www.facebook.com/BrettGuyPhotography/
Dec 6, 2016
812
987
After cropping a FF image to match the FoV taken from the same spot, they will actually have the same amount of noise in them. Unless the sensors are very different, which should be the case comparing the 70D to any newer Canon of course.

But the point remains. After all, both images would have come from an identical sized sensor area and therefore have the same amount of light. Why would one be less noisy than the other?
Pixel density. Generally the apsc sensor have smaller pixels so you would be expanding everything about that pixel more. Including the noise . I will be honest though there is nothing scientific behind what I am saying. Just what I have generally noticed. I could be wrong though
 

stevelee

FT-QL
Jul 6, 2017
1,609
512
Davidson, NC
Pixel density. Generally the apsc sensor have smaller pixels so you would be expanding everything about that pixel more. Including the noise . I will be honest though there is nothing scientific behind what I am saying. Just what I have generally noticed. I could be wrong though
Like for most things, the answer is usually "It depends." For most of us, experience will suggest the best tool for the job out of what we have available to use. Having more pixels and more noise is its own tradeoff, and the advantage/disadvantage could easily vary by what you want to do with it. My experience goes along with your observations.
 
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Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
I didn't mean to imply anything negative about Canon's sealing, as I've heard that they do a good job of sealing in general. In fact, that's one (of many) reasons I'm so eager to get the R5 and start a new chapter in my photographic adventures with it. :)
I wouldn't get too carried away with it in the rain if I were you. Canon's 1 series might be reasonably water resistant, but there's been far too many cases of water damaged lesser models in the Canon range, and that might well include the R5.
 
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smeyer02

EOS 70D
Jul 2, 2020
2
0
Upstate NY
Like for most things, the answer is usually "It depends." For most of us, experience will suggest the best tool for the job out of what we have available to use. Having more pixels and more noise is its own tradeoff, and the advantage/disadvantage could easily vary by what you want to do with it. My experience goes along with your observations.
Thanks @Aussie shooter , @Joules , and @stevelee for the responses. I've got to decide if the R6 tradeoff of fewer pixels for (assumed) less noise works for what I like to shoot.

I think it's going to be a pretty steep reduction in pixels, though. If I hypothetically fill the frame with a subject at the minimum WD of my macro lens on the 70D, I'll get a 20.2 MP image. An image taken at the same WD on the R6 will fill only the center 39% of the sensor (1/1.6^2). That's only a 7.8 MP image based on the R6 sensor spec of 20 MP.

(again, I welcome corrections to my math / logic).
 

Aussie shooter

www.facebook.com/BrettGuyPhotography/
Dec 6, 2016
812
987
Thanks @Aussie shooter , @Joules , and @stevelee for the responses. I've got to decide if the R6 tradeoff of fewer pixels for (assumed) less noise works for what I like to shoot.

I think it's going to be a pretty steep reduction in pixels, though. If I hypothetically fill the frame with a subject at the minimum WD of my macro lens on the 70D, I'll get a 20.2 MP image. An image taken at the same WD on the R6 will fill only the center 39% of the sensor (1/1.6^2). That's only a 7.8 MP image based on the R6 sensor spec of 20 MP.

(again, I welcome corrections to my math / logic).
I think that despite the loss of resolution you will be happy with the images. Just based on the much newer sensor tech if nothing else. You will have far more ability to raise the shadows etc. I certainly hope it is a good choice because I will be making pretty much the same choice when I get an R6 to compliment my 7d2 which has the same sensor as the 70d.
 
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spomeniks

I'm New Here
Feb 11, 2014
11
6
I think the AF alone is reasone enough to switch back :)
I have the S1H, while it offers a incredible good image quality, the lack of a good constant AF makes it use in a lot of situations more difficult. Especialy on a gimbal, there is pretty much no way to use it with a shallow depth of field...
Oh man, I went from the 5D4 to the S1 and I know exactly what you mean! Having decent AF while using a gimbal is an incredible thing from a usability standpoint
 
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