Show your Bird Portraits

Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
CR Pro
Nov 7, 2013
3,284
1,703
Germany
I've never seen so much color saturation like in these pics of a blue tit.
It was a bright sunny day, like lots before. So really good light. But never before the colors of a blue tit have been so jazzy before. :)
In post I only adapted the WB to day, did some reframing, and slight sharpening. But no change to saturation or contrast.
So color is OOC.

Blue-tit_6.JPG


Blue-tit_5.JPG Blue-tit_7.JPG Blue-tit_8.JPG

Edit: and - I just forgot - in the end it's turning its back on me :ROFLMAO:
 
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usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
992
1,396
Kentucky, USA
I'd like to thank all those that gave me feedback on their preferred bird photos of mine to frame & hang (along with others) in our little town's gallery for the summer. I'm new to this all and honored to be part of it. I've never sold a single piece, but the kind feedback on them is reward enough.

I've got the voter's top 7 printed out and wanted to mention what everyone's preferences was. The number of votes for each is shown below and the photos are re-shown (in thumbnails) respectively. (note: photo #1 was taken at ISO 12,800 so I've re-done it to (hopefully) look a little better with less noise)

Photo: 1, 14, 5
Votes: 17, 17, 15
A01_5363_1crdnlDark.jpg A03_0932_14YngLuv.jpg A01_9993_5titmouse.jpg




Photo: 07, 10, 12, 3
Votes: 13, 12, 12, 10
A02_2636_7cardnl2Wng.jpg A02_3874_10FCardinal.jpg A03_0378_12chikad_ice.jpg A01_8678_3cardnlWing.jpg


The remaining 7 were:
Photo: 13, 9, 8, 4, 11, 2, 6
Votes: 07, 6, 5, 4, 04, 2, 0


For those interested, the "8th" framed photo I'm putting up is of Ollie, a year ago when just a wee kitten (from my Oly EM1_II camera)
as seen in the thread: https://www.canonrumors.com/forum/threads/jolly-ollie-advent-calendar-2020.39772/
P6060253_OllieTuckered.jpg

Thanks again.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,749
2,222
Alberta, Canada
I'd like to thank all those that gave me feedback on their preferred bird photos of mine to frame & hang (along with others) in our little town's gallery for the summer. I'm new to this all and honored to be part of it. I've never sold a single piece, but the kind feedback on them is reward enough.

I've got the voter's top 7 printed out and wanted to mention what everyone's preferences was. The number of votes for each is shown below and the photos are re-shown (in thumbnails) respectively. (note: photo #1 was taken at ISO 12,800 so I've re-done it to (hopefully) look a little better with less noise)

Photo: 1, 14, 5
Votes: 17, 17, 15
View attachment 196834 View attachment 196835 View attachment 196836




Photo: 07, 10, 12, 3
Votes: 13, 12, 12, 10
View attachment 196837 View attachment 196838 View attachment 196839 View attachment 196840


The remaining 7 were:
Photo: 13, 9, 8, 4, 11, 2, 6
Votes: 07, 6, 5, 4, 04, 2, 0


For those interested, the "8th" framed photo I'm putting up is of Ollie, a year ago when just a wee kitten (from my Oly EM1_II camera)
as seen in the thread: https://www.canonrumors.com/forum/threads/jolly-ollie-advent-calendar-2020.39772/
View attachment 196841

Thanks again.
I really hesitate to offer critical commentary and I wouldn't if it were not for the fact that what I'm going to say was directed my way here in the forum about 8 years ago by a pretty knowledgeable individual. Many bird lovers like me also suffer from GAS. We tend to put all our focus on our subject such as how sharp it is, how much detail in the eyelashes, how brilliant the colours and so forth and... possibly neglect the composition, which is more than just the bird. I was told to not crop so tightly on the bird; allow it to have some context, particularly if there are interesting shapes or elements in the photo that will actually direct the viewers eye to the subject. Along with that is the general comment of not always placing the subject in the centre of the photo. Of course these are just guidelines, not hard and fast rules and of course we still live in a free society where we can be individuals. FWIW Of course, I like these photos in case that might be in doubt.

Jack
 

Cog

EOS RP
Dec 6, 2013
663
1,135
Qatar
I really hesitate to offer critical commentary and I wouldn't if it were not for the fact that what I'm going to say was directed my way here in the forum about 8 years ago by a pretty knowledgeable individual. Many bird lovers like me also suffer from GAS. We tend to put all our focus on our subject such as how sharp it is, how much detail in the eyelashes, how brilliant the colours and so forth and... possibly neglect the composition, which is more than just the bird. I was told to not crop so tightly on the bird; allow it to have some context, particularly if there are interesting shapes or elements in the photo that will actually direct the viewers eye to the subject. Along with that is the general comment of not always placing the subject in the centre of the photo. Of course these are just guidelines, not hard and fast rules and of course we still live in a free society where we can be individuals. FWIW Of course, I like these photos in case that might be in doubt.

Jack
Totally agree! My personal two pence is to try avoiding too many branches in the photo. Branches can make a nice frame, but not a background. This recommendation will make bird photography a more challenging activity, but it's worth it.
 

usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
992
1,396
Kentucky, USA
I really hesitate to offer critical commentary and I wouldn't if it were not for the fact that what I'm going to say was directed my way here in the forum about 8 years ago by a pretty knowledgeable individual. Many bird lovers like me also suffer from GAS. We tend to put all our focus on our subject such as how sharp it is, how much detail in the eyelashes, how brilliant the colours and so forth and... possibly neglect the composition, which is more than just the bird. I was told to not crop so tightly on the bird; allow it to have some context, particularly if there are interesting shapes or elements in the photo that will actually direct the viewers eye to the subject. Along with that is the general comment of not always placing the subject in the centre of the photo. Of course these are just guidelines, not hard and fast rules and of course we still live in a free society where we can be individuals. FWIW Of course, I like these photos in case that might be in doubt.

Jack
Thanks, Jack.

I haven't really studied the art of how to position & crop subjects for photography (but I probably should have!).
I do know about the rule of thirds, and leading the eye into the subject area with forground/middleground/distance (well, for landscapes).
But I end up just cropping & positioning things so that they just seem to work for me visually, while trying to have eyes on one of the 1/3rd lines if possible.
Cropping tight or keeping wide open is something I consider based on how interesting the background is, and how interesting the subject is. I often try different combinations of sizing as well as portrait/landscape orientations.

It's something that I hope to get better at as I do it more (as in all things in life, if possible).
I'm glad you like these, and I'll always welcome suggestions regarding what might make them better.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,749
2,222
Alberta, Canada
Thanks, Jack.

I haven't really studied the art of how to position & crop subjects for photography (but I probably should have!).
I do know about the rule of thirds, and leading the eye into the subject area with forground/middleground/distance (well, for landscapes).
But I end up just cropping & positioning things so that they just seem to work for me visually, while trying to have eyes on one of the 1/3rd lines if possible.
Cropping tight or keeping wide open is something I consider based on how interesting the background is, and how interesting the subject is. I often try different combinations of sizing as well as portrait/landscape orientations.

It's something that I hope to get better at as I do it more (as in all things in life, if possible).
I'm glad you like these, and I'll always welcome suggestions regarding what might make them better.
Well, I'm in the same boat with a desire but I'm not trained, so I, like you, am always looking at ways to improve my vision. Never the less, all this must remain fun or it's pointless (unless we wish to go commercial of course).

Jack
 
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ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
CR Pro
Apr 30, 2017
1,293
2,689
Totally agree! My personal two pence is to try avoiding too many branches in the photo. Branches can make a nice frame, but not a background. This recommendation will make bird photography a more challenging activity, but it's worth it.
If you look at the pure photo-aspect it's totally right!
But:
1. I'm taking photos regularly, no mater what is in front of me - rare or very common bird. I think photography is not just an art - it's also kind of sport. Keeping your skills fresh will help you also in the moment when you need every thing from yourself to get that rare bird/interesting scene... Your fingers should know where they have to push/rotate "without engaging your mind" because you are busy with framing or so...
2. Sometimes you know the opportunity to get a photo of that bird is low/to extremely low - and you shoot anyway (and you perfectly know that from pure photog point you are getting something of low quality). But you just got something interesting (from birders perspective)!
3. If we were posting here just the very best (from photogs point of view!) this topic wouldn't have that many participants - there is something else here... And I personally like it!!!

And finally (damn it - I got tired of so much typing!!!) -some photos from today. Nothing interesting, I'm just keeping myself fit...
White Tern - from adult (in very bad, harshly contrasting light!) to the babies of the whitish form and to the brownish form. And few of the Red-vented Bulbul.
Sorry for the branches but it didn't pop up for better photo :(!



DSC_4560_DxO.jpg
DSC_4569_DxO.jpg
DSC_4606_DxO.jpg
DSC_4634_DxO.jpg
DSC_4707_DxO.jpg
 

Cog

EOS RP
Dec 6, 2013
663
1,135
Qatar
If you look at the pure photo-aspect it's totally right!
But:
1. I'm taking photos regularly, no mater what is in front of me - rare or very common bird. I think photography is not just an art - it's also kind of sport. Keeping your skills fresh will help you also in the moment when you need every thing from yourself to get that rare bird/interesting scene... Your fingers should know where they have to push/rotate "without engaging your mind" because you are busy with framing or so...
2. Sometimes you know the opportunity to get a photo of that bird is low/to extremely low - and you shoot anyway (and you perfectly know that from pure photog point you are getting something of low quality). But you just got something interesting (from birders perspective)!
3. If we were posting here just the very best (from photogs point of view!) this topic wouldn't have that many participants - there is something else here... And I personally like it!!!

And finally (damn it - I got tired of so much typing!!!) -some photos from today. Nothing interesting, I'm just keeping myself fit...
White Tern - from adult (in very bad, harshly contrasting light!) to the babies of the whitish form and to the brownish form. And few of the Red-vented Bulbul.
Sorry for the branches but it didn't pop up for better photo :(!



View attachment 196855 View attachment 196856 View attachment 196857 View attachment 196858 View attachment 196859
Great photos! And I concur with every sentence in you long text. I'm doing exactly the same. And I didn't want to offend anybody. The key word in my previous post was "trying"! :)
 
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AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
7,867
8,953
We take bird photos for a number of reasons, including: for the record of our bird watching and for identification; to capture a rare bird, which is exciting for us and maybe of general interest; to capture birds in action doing things that birds do; and to produce artistically satisfying compositions. My own route in bird photography proceeded time wise in that order, and I now try my hand at all of them. Taking bird photos give me great joy and adds purpose to all of my recreational walks and holidays and I carry a camera and lightweight telephoto lens just about everywhere I go and find time during breaks in meetings to take photos. Where the bird per se is of prime importance, then composition is subsidiary. For common birds, then composition becomes more important, in my mind.
 

usern4cr

R5
CR Pro
Sep 2, 2018
992
1,396
Kentucky, USA
Well, I'm in the same boat with a desire but I'm not trained, so I, like you, am always looking at ways to improve my vision. Never the less, all this must remain fun or it's pointless (unless we wish to go commercial of course).

Jack
I agree. If someone wants to buy something of mine then I'm glad to sell it (and it would be a thrill) but I'm retired and enjoy whatever "hobby" I want at the moment and the last thing I'd want is to try to make money in photography which (I assume) is a really tough way for even long-time professionals to make a good living at currently.
 
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