Rumors of a Canon EOS R5c and EOS R5s [CR1]

EOS 4 Life

EOS M6 Mark II
Sep 20, 2020
54
24
Actually, a 3 series made sense back when the 5D was originally released as the 5D back then was not the high quality camera it became later, being in many ways closer to the later 6D. Historically, the EOS 3 replaced the EOS 5 and sat in exactly the spot, relative to the 1-series, that the current iteration of the 5D sits in.

Putting a 3-series inbetween the 5 and 1 stopped making sense once the 5D got similar AF as the 1-series and the 6-series was introduced (which also pushed the 5D into the higher price bracket where there was previously room for a 3-series). Also, for naming reasons there could never be an "EOS 3D" as that would just be too ridiculous unless it came with 3D capabilities.

Of course, there might still be room for a 3-series. But it's hard to see what might fit in when we do not know what the R1 will bring. Besides, with the price of the R5 as it is and the R1 probably coming in around where the 1D sits...
Canon's S1H is the 1DX.
Speed is the top priority, so I would not expect much over 20MP and 5K RAW for R1.
That is also why I would expect a video-focused R5 to shoot 8K RAW video.
 

dwarven

EOS 90D
Dec 12, 2019
174
204
Lossless compressesd raw would be more processor intensive both in camera and post processing in a computer. It requires extra steps to compress and decompress.
No, the exact opposite is true. In modern cameras with modern CPUs, compressing image files results in faster read/write times and longer continuous shooting time. Otherwise, there'd be no reason at all to use compression and you'd just shoot uncompressed RAW all day. Maybe when DSLRs first came out it was better to not use compression and just shoot JPGs, but that's no longer the case. And any time lost needed to decompress the files on your computer is pretty much negligible with modern day CPUs and SSDs.
 
Last edited:

EOS 4 Life

EOS M6 Mark II
Sep 20, 2020
54
24
No, the exact opposite is true. In modern cameras with modern CPUs, compressing image files results in faster read/write times and longer continuous shooting time. Otherwise, there'd be no reason at all to use compression and you'd just shoot uncompressed RAW all day. Maybe when DSLRs first came out it was better to not use compression and just shoot JPGs, but that's no longer the case.
Faster read and write is less I/O intensive but it is more processor intensive.
The processor is encrypting and decrypting the files making it easier for the I/O.
 

Fischer

EOS M6 Mark II
Mar 17, 2020
74
44
Combining high resolution with "speed" sounds impossible. It of course depends on how you interprets the term "speed". But already 12fps sounds unrealistic in my ears?
Somebody's wishful thinking?
Cache can make it do 12 fps for maybe a 24 shot burst. Should be more than enough for most people. Sounds to me like the 5RS is the camera to rule them all (of course have to see this happen first).
 

Antono Refa

EOS R
Mar 26, 2014
1,100
279
Faster read and write is less I/O intensive but it is more processor intensive.
The processor is encrypting and decrypting the files making it easier for the I/O.
The speed difference between CPU and I/O is such, compression saves more time on I/O than spent in decompression by CPU. As decompression is done only when opening the raw file with image processing software*, decompression is infrequent. Then it saves on storage cost, time to upload to cloud for backup, etc. Bottom line, I think lossless compression is a benefit.

* Thumbnails displayed in shell are not generated from the raw data. The camera saves a small image for that purpose within the raw image.
 

tron

EOS R5
CR Pro
Nov 8, 2011
4,683
911
It still wouldn't do 4k120p and it would eat into the 1DX III as well (which will be firmware updated alongside the R5) and it would cost as much as the R5 as well, which overall has a better base for video.
So it makes very little sense.
To tell the truth I forgot the smile icon at the end. I believe that we will have to wait the next generation chips in a few years for the temperature issue to get solved (actually not solved but moved to higher video rates so Canon will always be - what else? - doomed :D )